Literary Critic offentlig
[search 0]
Mer

Download the App!

show episodes
 
Two British lifelong Harry Potter fans Hannah and Charlie re-read their favourite childhood book chapter by chapter with added alcohol and cynicism in fortnightly episodes! The perfect podcast for HP fans who want to revisit the story through an adult lens (AKA, NSFW), and with the added bonus of British accents, Hannah and Charlie lovingly tear apart the books pointing out plot holes, anti-feminist moments, transphobia, fat phobia, and most of all...dick jokes. A unique combination of intel ...
 
In The God Setebos podcast, the editors of Xi Draconis Books (Patrick Barney, Chris Malmberg, and Hans Burger) review and discuss novels, short story collections, poetry, and other forms of literature. They also explore literary criticism and philosophy to some extent, as well as the occasional episode on music. Xi Draconis Books is an anarchist indie press that publishes socially engaged literature. As a statement against commodification, all the books that XDB publishes are free to readers ...
 
A monthly conversation about books and ideas on NTS Radio hosted by friends Carrie Plitt, a literary agent, and Octavia Bright, a writer and academic. Each show features an author interview, book recommendations, lively discussion and a little music too, all built around a related theme - anything from the novella to race to masculinity. Listen live on NTS Radio www.nts.live
 
The purpose of DIBTB is to criticize and analyze literary works of romance fiction and spread sexual awareness in society. As with all literary criticisms, the main part of taking apart these works is to reflect on society and the human condition. By reading and accessing the books on the show, I hope to bring my listeners to a better understanding of our society and themselves.
 
Each “season” of Two Month Review highlights a new and amazing work of world literature, reading it slowly over the course of eight to nine episodes. Featuring a rotating set of literary guests—from authors to booksellers, critics, and translators—each episode recaps a short section of the book and uses that as a springboard for a fun (and often irreverent) discussion about literature in a general sense, pop culture, reading approaches, and much more. Talking about great books doesn't need t ...
 
Through wide ranging conversations with philosophers, literary critics, artists, and theologians, philosopher Jennifer A. Frey explores the nature of love and happiness as depicted in important works of literature, poetry, and film.Our project is supported by a generous grant from the John Templeton Foundation and housed at the University of Chicago.
 
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was a German writer and statesman. His body of work includes epic and lyric poetry written in a variety of metres and styles; prose and verse dramas; memoirs; an autobiography; literary and aesthetic criticism; treatises on botany, anatomy, and colour; and four novels. In addition, numerous literary and scientific fragments, more than 10,000 letters, and nearly 3,000 drawings by him are extant. - Summary by Wikipedia
 
Literary critics see Arthur Machen’s works as a significant part of the late Victorian revival of the gothic novel and the decadent movement of the 1890s, bearing direct comparison to the themes found in contemporary works like Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, and Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray. The White People is a highly influential horror story of a young girl’s discovery of ancient magic. It was written in the late 1890 ...
 
In this podcast Dr Neema Parvini, Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Surrey, and author of several books, interviews various Shakespeare scholars and literary theorists from around the world in a bid to gain an understanding of the current state of play in Shakespeare studies and in literary criticism more generally. Through a series of candid talks, it will tackle the biggest theoretical and practical questions that have preoccupied scholars and readers of Shakespeare alike for ...
 
This is Mark Twain's vicious and amusing review of Fenimore Cooper's literary art. It is still read widely in academic circles. Twain's essay, Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses (often spelled "Offences") (1895), particularly criticized The Deerslayer and The Pathfinder. Twain wrote at the beginning of the essay: 'In one place in Deerslayer, and in the restricted space of two-thirds of a page, Cooper has scored 114 offenses against literary art out of a possible 115. It breaks the record.' ...
 
Few literary terms are more hotly debated, discounted, or derided than the "Great American Novel." But while critics routinely dismiss the phrase as at best hype and as at worst exclusionary, the belief that a national literature commensurate with both the scope and the contradictions of being American persists. In this podcast Scott Yarbrough and Kirk Curnutt examine totemic works such as Herman Melville's Moby-Dick and Toni Morrison's Beloved that have been labeled GANs, exploring their th ...
 
"I think that I shall never see, a poem as lovely as a tree; A tree whose hungry mouth is presd against the sweet earth's flowing breast ...". Almost all of us, including myself of course, have heard and enjoyed those famous words which begin Kilmer's poem, Trees. There is even a National Forest in the United States named in honor of this poem. Here is a recording of the entire book of poems in which it was first published in 1914. Joyce Kilmer was an American writer and poet mainly remember ...
 
Nearly 160 years after it was first published, Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass continues to inspire, enthrall and educate generations of readers. This collection of poems serves as a vehicle for Whitman's philosophy, ideals, love of nature and mystical musings and it subsequently became one of the corner stones of American literature. Whitman was inspired to write Leaves of Grass based on Ralph Waldo Emerson's clarion call for a truly American poet who would tell of its glories, virtues and v ...
 
The Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities (IASH) in the University of Queensland is dedicated to high level research in a range of humanities disciplines with a focus on Intellectual and Literary History, Critical and Cultural Studies, the History of Emotions, and Science and Society. It has a core of permanent research-focused academics and postdoctoral researchers working on specific projects, and hosts short stay Faculty and Visiting Fellows.
 
An atypical piece of writing by Mark Twain, the short bawdy skit documents a conversion between Queen Elizabeth and several notable writers of the time, including Sir Walter Raleigh, Francis Beaumont, Ben Jonson, and William Shakespeare. Despite first being published in 1880, the piece remained anonymous for a period of time, until it was later acknowledged by Twain in 1901 as his own. Comprised of humor, descriptive imagery, ribald connotations, and vulgar language, the faux conversation is ...
 
Dream Tower Media's critically acclaimed monthly podcast featuring fascinating and fun conversations with authors and artists of fantasy, magic realism and science fiction, plus amusing skits, quips, and sound effects. In addition, approximately twice a year, fully produced audio adventures of fantastic stories are presented. Hosted by Robert Zoltan and his sidekick Edgar the Raven in the Dream Tower.
 
Fenimore Cooper - author of The Deerslayer, The Last of the Mohicans, etc - has often been praised, but just as often been criticised for his writing. Mark Twain wrote a funny, vicious little essay on the subject, in which he states: "In one place in 'Deerslayer,' and in the restricted space of two-thirds of a page, Cooper has scored 114 offences against literary art out of a possible 115." (Summary by Gesine)
 
If you've read and loved Alice in Wonderland, you wouldn't want to miss reading about her further adventures, the strange and fantastical creatures she meets and the delightful style and word-play that made the first book so appealing. Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll is thematically much more structured and cleverly constructed as compared to the earlier Alice book but still retains its childhood elements of wonder, curiosity and imagination. Lewis Carroll was the pseudonym of Rev ...
 
Margaret Steele Anderson was born in Louisville, Kentucky in 1867 and was educated in the public school of Louisville, with special courses at Wellesley College. From 1901 Miss Anderson was Literary Editor of the `Evening Post' of Louisville, and was known as one of the most discriminating critics of the South. She published only one volume of verse, "The Flame in the Wind", 1914. (David Lawrence
 
“I know not what tomorrow will bring – The Fernando Pessoa audiotour” is a documentary series dedicated to Fernando Pessoa. Pessoa’s story is told in 15 episodes. Each chapter was created having in mind a geographical location in Lisbon, Portugal, so the listener can experience it in two different ways: through a physical journey or through an imaginary journey. Each episode crosses biographical and literary key aspects of Fernando Pessoa and can be listened independently. The story is told ...
 
One of the longest-running books shows on Australian radio, Final Draft is a space on the air where big names of arts and culture sit cheek-by-jowl with those just beginning to make their mark. Produced in the hope of inspiring generous, open-minded reading and discussion, the show features guests and writing from around Australia and the world. Each week we serve up a mix of interviews with writers, reviews of new, classic and cult titles, readings of original work, short features and docum ...
 
Take one genre, two combative critics, five authors angling to break out of the pack and what have you got? “Blurb!” – the new book show that’s anything but bookish. Each week, bibliophiles Sally Shields and Dr. Kent review not books themselves but prerecorded pitches from five writers whose literary works are hot off the presses. And each has got a mere three minutes to convince the hosts that theirs is the one worth cracking. But if they succeed, they capture the coveted Book of the Week t ...
 
It's sad, but true to say that today Edward Morgan Forster's works are known more from their film and television adaptations rather than from their original novels. Yet, these adaptations have spurred many a fascinated viewer into going back to the library and finding the book that the film or miniseries was based on and this is ultimately the power of Forster's literary appeal. Howard's End was published in 1910 and it marked Forster's first taste of critical and commercial success. He had ...
 
An old monk is tricked by the Devil into undertaking a voyage to a remote island to save the souls of thousands who live there. He arrives on the island which is actually a desolate one, inhabited only by colonies of millions of penguins. The old monk whose eyesight and hearing are almost nonexistent, mistakes them for humans and begins baptizing them. In Heaven, God finds Himself in a dilemma; the old monk's unwavering faith compels him to regard the baptisms as genuine. However, in Christi ...
 
Johan August Strindberg was a Swedish playwright who has had many of his works read into Librivox by volunteers. From his earliest work, Strindberg developed forms of dramatic action, language, and visual composition so innovative that many were to become technically possible to stage only with the advent of film. He is considered the "father" of modern Swedish literature. The Growth of a Soul is Strindberg's own literary autobiography and recreation of the spirit of the times at Upsala Univ ...
 
THE HEPTAMERON, first published posthumously in 1558, is divided into seven complete days containing 10 stories each, and an eighth day containing only 2 stories. The stories, many of which deal with love and infidelity, resulted in "accusations of looseness" by critics of the day. The author, Margaret of Navarre (also known as Margaret of Angoulême) became an influential woman in the intellectual and cultural circles of the French Renaissance. From an 1892 essay by the translator George Sai ...
 
THE HEPTAMERON (here Volume 3 of 5), first published posthumously in 1558, is divided into seven complete days containing 10 stories each, and an eighth day containing only 2 stories. The stories, many of which deal with love and infidelity, resulted in "accusations of looseness" by critics of the day. The author, Margaret of Navarre (also known as Margaret of Angoulême) became an influential woman in the intellectual and cultural circles of the French Renaissance. From an 1892 essay by the ...
 
Christmas Eve. Guests round a fireside begin telling each other ghost stories. One of them relates a true incident involving the governess of his little nephew and niece. Strange events begin to take place, involving the housekeeper, a stranger who prowls round the grounds, a mysterious woman dressed in black and an unknown misdemeanor committed by the little nephew. The Turn of the Screw by Henry James was published in 1893 and it remains one of the best-known and admired works of this grea ...
 
An epistolary novel, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall follows the courageous journey of the protagonist, Helen Graham, as she struggles to escape her socially imposed role as dutiful wife, while also acting on her moral responsibilities as a mother and self-respect as a woman. Published in 1848, under the pseudonym Acton Bell, the novel provoked much criticism at the time of its release due to its shocking content and atypical portrayal of an English wife, who not only defies the strict conventio ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
“The Engagement,” by Sasha Issenberg, recounts the complex and chaotic chain reaction that thrust same-sex marriage from the realm of conservative conjecture to the top of the gay political agenda and, eventually, to the halls of the Supreme Court. On this week’s podcast, Issenberg talks about the deeply researched book, which covers 25 years of le…
 
Chad and Brian get into some fun and vengeful parts of Vernon Subutex 2 this week, talking about Gaëll, the proliferation of diereses in this section, getting revenge, Vernon's magical music, and more. This week's music is "The Modern World" by The Jam. If you'd prefer to watch the conversation, you can find it on YouTube along with all our past ep…
 
Trigger warning: memory loss/alzheimers/dementia discussion 53 minutes to 1:02:00. EPISODE 69! Nice. Join us in our new episode where we're drinking one of the nicest drinks we've drunk on the podcast so far, talking about Hermione's relationship with her parents (again), Ron buying Hermione perfume (?!?) and answering whether we think Neville is t…
 
Francis Spufford’s new novel, “Light Perpetual,” is rooted in a real event: the rocket attack on a Woolworth’s in London, killing 168 people, toward the end of World War II. Spufford fictionalizes the tragedy and invents five children who survive it, trailing them through the ensuing decades to discover all they might have done and seen if they had…
 
Book criticism - it’s a divisive topic, and one people feel very strongly about. Do you secretly relish a hatchet job, or think there's only space for glowing reviews?What actually is the function of criticism, and what makes it good or bad? Can it ever be truly impartial? This month's theme was recommended by our patron Angelique, and it's one we …
 
Kaija Straumanis pinch hits this week to talk about Céleste, about spray painting insults, the best forms of revenge, how to upend a system, and whether of not a good dad can be an alcoholic. This episode is a great prelude to one of the major plot points of the trilogy, so listen to this and get ready for next week . . . This week's music is "They…
 
The first episode of season two! Gerry and Aaron discuss the gameplan for Grad School Achebe, the history and reception of African literature inside and outside academia, Achebe's place in the canon, his uncanny recurrent deaths on social media, the finer points of pronunciation, and more. Next week: the podcast falls apart. Texts discussed: Chinua…
 
Evan is tired of this mother f*#$'n Monster Blood, on the this mother f*#$'n plane! The Monster Blood books have always been extremely popular, but due to budget constraints Monster Blood 2 could not be made into a television episode. So what did we get? Flight Monster Blood! A retconned Monsterblood 1.5 that was not written by RLS. Weird? You bet!…
 
Jake Bonner, the protagonist of Jean Hanff Korelitz’s “The Plot,” writes a novel based on someone else’s idea. The book becomes a big hit, but Jake has a hard time enjoying it because he’s worried about getting caught. On this week’s podcast, Korelitz says that Jake’s more general anxieties about his career as a writer are relatable, despite her ow…
 
Hello! We're halfway through Order of the Pheonix which can mean only one thing - THE HOUSE CUP ANNOUNCEMENT! We're saying a massive congrats to Ravenclaw for winning it, as well as a huge congrats to our new prefects Rachel, Sophie, Mary and our headhuman Alex. We also barely talk about HP whilst drinking 'Bloo Goo', a terrible drink invention fro…
 
Maggie O’Farrell’s “Hamnet,” one of last year’s most widely acclaimed novels, imagines the life of William Shakespeare, his wife, Anne (or Agnes) Hathaway, and the couple’s son Hamnet, who died at 11 years old in 1596. On this week’s podcast, O’Farrell says she always planned for the novel to have the ensemble cast it does, but that her deepest mot…
 
Derek Maine returns for his second appearance this season to talk about Alex Bleach's tapes, Vodka Satana's death, how the system is rigged, horrible men, the complications of passing judgement, Motörhead, mushroom powder, and much more. This is a pretty key episode, as the trilogy veers into detective novel territory, and the conflict with Dopalet…
 
Our guest this month is the novelist Rachel Kushner, who we have been huge fans of ever since we read her novel The Flamethrowers. Rachel’s latest book is a collection of essays, The Hard Crowd. Though it covers a lot of ground, the collection returns often to the rebels and misfits and outsiders living on the edge of society - a theme in her ficti…
 
Chad and Brian go it alone this week to talk about whether this is one book or three (or three "seasons" of one book), or how Xavier and Patrice are both awful people but in entirely different ways, the breadth of characterization in Despentes's writing, all the jokes you can make knowing "Subutex" is Methadone, how to properly store gasoline in pl…
 
Students, please find your seats! Today we will be covering school dance posters, mannequin modern art memorials for dead kids, disembodied voices, black and white child purgatory... This kind of thing is pretty much the curriculum for an RL Stine school. Matt and Dave grab their Jansports and take a step into the halls of The Haunted School!…
 
Louis Menand’s new book, “The Free World: Art and Thought in the Cold War,” covers the interchange of arts and ideas between the United States and Europe in the decades following World War II. On this week’s podcast, Menand talks about the book, including why he chose to frame his telling from the end of the war until 1965. “What I didn’t get right…
 
On the eve of its seventieth birthday, Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man (1952) occupies a unique place in the American canon. On the one hand, it was instantly heralded as a Great American Novel---indeed, as Lawrence Buell notes in his study of GANs, it was the first novel by an African American to be universally admitted to the pantheon of important …
 
Translator Frank Wynne joins Chad and Brian to talk about slang, about yummy mummies, about why Vernon's pseudonym is so weird, and much much more. This is an episode as much about translating and reading as it is about the book proper, and is definitely worth listening to. This week's music is "Waiting Room" by Fugazi. If you'd prefer to watch the…
 
Ello ello ello! It's another episodeeeeeee. In todays ep we're chatting about chapters 20 & 21 of OOTP. Charlie resets the vibe in a...creative way, and we comment on how wizards make themselves the centre of attention with everything, giants, and how Cho so relatably goes from crying to horny in 0.2 seconds. Merch www.gobletofwine.co.uk patreon.co…
 
In 2018, Michael Lewis published “The Fifth Risk,” which argued, in short, that the federal government was underprepared for a variety of disaster scenarios. Guess what his new book is about? Lewis visits the podcast this week to discuss “The Premonition,” which recounts the initial response to the coronavirus pandemic. “It wasn’t just Trump,” Lewi…
 
Some people treat books like they are sacred objects, others scribble all over them (or even cut them in half). Of course, books are objects, but they're also portals to other universes, new ways of thinking, adventures, romances, and more. The suggestion for this theme was sent to us on Patreon by a patron called Agnes - who asked if we’d talk abo…
 
Translator Katie Whittemore (Four by Four, The Communist's Daughter, World's Best Mother, Last Words on Earth) joins Chad and Brian to talk about the horrible actions of Patrice, and whether he could be redeemed, about childbirth, about Aïcha and Hyena, and about Disney. Funny and cutting, this episode explores the book's tensions and MacGuffin, th…
 
The original Deep Trouble was one of the best selling Goosebumps books in the series and also won the prestigious Nickelodeon Kids' Choice Award. The fans wanted more, so RLS delivered. The Deep family are in deep sh*t again. No mermaids this time, but I'm pretty sure Sheena gets swallowed by a female reproductive organ. I don't know, just read it.…
 
In her new book, “Antitrust,” Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota explores the history of fighting monopoly power in this country, and argues that the digital age calls for a renewed effort. “I think the best way to do this right now is to have our laws be as sophisticated as the companies that we’re dealing with,” Klobuchar says on this week’s podc…
 
Caitlin Luce Baker of Island Books joins Chad and Brian to talk about a very nicely framed section of Vernon Subutex. We get introduced to Aïcha, who has, through Pamela Kant, just found out that her mom was a porn star before her death. (And had a fling with Alex Bleach.) We also get to see how the Hyena works (kind of), and leave off with her and…
 
WE'RE BACK TOGETHER! Covid 19 rules now allow for 'non-essential' businesses to open, which apparently, our podcast is 'non-essential'? Who knew. So with some sexy social distancing rules in place we're FINALLY recording together again! We're chatting about chapters 18 & 19 of OOTP whilst drinking a literal TUB of alcohol. We discuss Harry and Ron'…
 
Patrick Radden Keefe’s new book, “Empire of Pain,” is a history of the Sacklers, the family behind Purdue Pharma, the creator of the powerful painkiller OxyContin, which became the root of the opioid crisis in the United States. One of the subjects covered in Keefe’s investigative work is what the company knew, and when, as the crisis began to unfo…
 
The Great American Novel podcast is an ongoing discussion about the novels we hold up as significant achievements in our American literary culture. Additionally, we sometimes suggest novels who should break into the sometimes problematical canon and at other times we’ll suggest books which can be dropped from such lofty consideration. Your hosts ar…
 
Everyone needs a little magic from time to time, and this episode is brimming with it. We spoke to Leone Ross about her sensuous, absorbing new novel, This One Sky Day, which is set in the fictional Carribean archipelago of Popisho, where everyone is born with a certain magical gift, or cors. It's a story about many things, but mainly of two lovers…
 
We’ve been in celebration mode all week as the Book Review’s podcast turns 15 years old. Pamela Paul shared 15 of her favorite episodes since she began hosting in 2013. We chose 10 other memorable conversations from the show’s full archives, and did a bit of digging to tell the story of the podcast’s earliest days. Now, appropriately, we cap things…
 
Emma Ramadan—translator of Despentes's Pretty Things and Anne Garreta (among many others), and recent winner of the PEN Translation Prize—joins Brian and Chad to talk about how cool Despentes is, and how much slang she uses in her work. They also discuss the conflict that will drive the plot (Laurent Dopalet vs. Bleach's tapes), inventing fake iden…
 
In today's episode, we're talking about chapter 17 of Order of the Pheonix, how Hogwarts needs a sex room, how problematic the staircase slide is, and what a ridiculous amount of male violence there is in Harry Potter. Merch www.gobletofwine.co.uk patreon.com/gobletofwine Twitter.com/gobletofwinepod Instagram.com/gobletofwinepodcast www.facebook.co…
 
Blake Bailey’s long-awaited biography of Philip Roth has generated renewed conversation about the life and work of the towering American novelist who died at 85 in 2018. Bailey visits the podcast this week to take part in that conversation himself. “Most of Philip’s life was spent in this little cottage in the woods of Connecticut, standing at a de…
 
The fifteenth iteration of the Two Month Review kicks off in a big way, giving a quick overview of Virginie Despentes's life and work for Brian, and then launching into the wonderful world Despentes constructs filled with characters who are past their prime, who are flawed and don't hide their warts. The subtle ways in which Despentes criticizes so…
 
It has - astonishingly - been a year since our first lockdown minisode (Escapism in Quarantine), and here in the UK we are just starting to emerge from the latest restrictions. So, in honour of being able to meet six people outside again, we are dedicating this minisode to books about groups of friends. What makes stories about friendship groups so…
 
Loading …

Hurtigreferanseguide

Copyright 2021 | Sitemap | Personvern | Vilkår for bruk
Google login Twitter login Classic login