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Breaking Math is a podcast that aims to make math accessible to everyone, and make it enjoyable. Every other week, topics such as chaos theory, forbidden formulas, and more will be covered in detail. If you have 45 or so minutes to spare, you're almost guaranteed to learn something new! *See our new math and science youtube show called "Turing Rabbit Holes" at youtube.com/turingrabbitholespodcast ! The Breaking Math Podcast team has teamed up with Particle Physicist and Science Fiction Autho ...
 
The Ethereal Podcast is brought to you by the team behind the Ethereal Summit, a global series of conferences focused on connecting leading developers, companies, and influencers shaping the future of blockchain and Ethereum. In the podcast, we interview the movers and shakers featured on the Ethereal stage. We discuss what they're building and scaling on Ethereum, why it matters, and insights on how you and others can benefit from the technological revolution behind it all. The Ethereal Pod ...
 
The Hacking UI podcast is hosted by Sagi Shrieber and David Tintner, a designer and developer who are also both entrepreneurs, bloggers, productivity/time-hacking maniacs, and all around tech geeks. The first season of the podcast is titled ‘Scaling a Design Team’, in which they speak with design leaders from top notch companies like Facebook, Apple, Invision, and Intercom, to discuss various team structures, responsibilities, and workflows. After quitting their day jobs to work full time on ...
 
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The world is a big place with a lot of wonderful things in it. The world also happens to be spherical, which can make getting to those things a challenge if you don't have many landmarks. This is the case when people are navigating by sea. For this reason, map projections, which take a sphere and attempt to flatten it onto a sheet, were born. So wh…
 
This is a rerun of one of our favorite episodes! We hope that you enjoy it if you haven't listened to it yet. We'll be back next week with new content! Thank you so much for listening to Breaking Math!Math is a gravely serious topic which has been traditionally been done by stodgy people behind closed doors, and it cannot ever be taken lightly. Tho…
 
Voting systems are, in modern times, essential to the way that large-scale decisions are made. The concept of voicing an opinion to be, hopefully, considered fairly is as ancient and well-established as the human concept of society in general. But, as time goes on, the recent massive influx of voting systems in the last 150 years have shown us that…
 
Forecasting is a constantly evolving science, and has been applied to complex systems; everything from the weather, to determining what customers might like to buy, and even what governments might rise and fall. John Fuisz is someone who works with this science, and has experience improving the accuracy of forecasting. So how can forecasting be ana…
 
This is a rerun of one of our favorite episodes while we change our studio around. Game theory is all about decision-making and how it is impacted by choice of strategy, and a strategy is a decision that is influenced not only by the choice of the decision-maker, but one or more similar decision makers. This episode will give an idea of the type of…
 
In mathematics, nature is a constant driving inspiration; mathematicians are part of nature, so this is natural. A huge part of nature is the idea of things like networks. These are represented by mathematical objects called 'graphs'. Graphs allow us to describe a huge variety of things, such as: the food chain, lineage, plumbing networks, electric…
 
How many piano tuners are there in New York City? How much cheese is there in Delaware? And how can you find out? All of this and more on this problem-episode of Breaking Math. This episode distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike-Noncommercial 4.0 International License. For more information, visit creativecommons.org Featuring t…
 
i^2 = j^2 = k^2 = ijk = -1. This deceptively simple formula, discovered by Irish mathematician William Rowan Hamilton in 1843, led to a revolution in the way 19th century mathematicians and scientists thought about vectors and rotation. This formula, which extends the complex numbers, allows us to talk about certain three-dimensional problems with …
 
Mathematics is full of all sorts of objects that can be difficult to comprehend. For example, if we take a slip of paper and glue it to itself, we can get a ring. If we turn it a half turn before gluing it to itself, we get what's called a Möbius strip, which has only one side twice the length of the paper. If we glue the edges of the Möbius strip …
 
In introductory geometry classes, many of the objects dealt with can be considered 'elementary' in nature; things like tetrahedrons, spheres, cylinders, planes, triangles, lines, and other such concepts are common in these classes. However, we often have the need to describe more complex objects. These objects can often be quite organic, or even ab…
 
Join Sofía and Gabriel as they talk about Morikawa's recently solved problem, first proposed in 1821 and not solved until last year! Also, if you haven't yet, check out our sponsor The Great Courses at thegreatcoursesplus.com/breakingmath for a free month! Learn basically anything there. The paper featured in this episode can be found at https://ar…
 
Join Sofía and Gabriel as they discuss an old but great proof of the irrationality of the square root of two. [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch] Ways to support the show: -Visit our Sponsors: theGreatCoursesPlus.com/breakingmath Get a free month of the Great Courses Plus while supporting this show by clicking the link and signing up! brilliant.…
 
If you are there, and I am here, we can measure the distance between us. If we are standing in a room, we can calculate the area of where we're standing; and, if we want, the volume. These are all examples of measures; which, essentially, tell us how much 'stuff' we have. So what is a measure? How are distance, area, and volume related? And how big…
 
Sofía and Gabriel discuss the question of "how many angles are there in a circle", and visit theorems from Euclid, as well as differential calculus. This episode is distributed under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license. For more information, visit CreativeCommons.org. Ways to support the show: -Visit our Sponsors: theGreatCoursesPlus.com/breakingmath Get a free…
 
Look at all you phonies out there. You poseurs. All of you sheep. Counting 'til infinity. Counting sheep. *pff* What if I told you there were more there? Like, ... more than you can count? But what would a sheeple like you know about more than infinity that you can count? heh. *pff* So, like, what does it mean to count til infinity? What does it me…
 
As a child, did you ever have a conversation that went as follows: "When I grow up, I want to have a million cats" "Well I'm gonna have a billion billion cats" "Oh yeah? I'm gonna have infinity cats" "Then I'm gonna have infinity plus one cats" "That's nothing. I'm gonna have infinity infinity cats" "I'm gonna have infinity infinity infinity infini…
 
There are a lot of things in the universe, but no matter how you break them down, you will still have far fewer particles than even some of the smaller of what we're calling the 'very large numbers'. Many people have a fascination with these numbers, and perhaps it is because their sheer scale can boggle the mind. So what numbers can be called 'lar…
 
Neuroscience is a topic that, in many ways, is in its infancy. The tools that are being used in this field are constantly being honed and reevaluated as our understanding of the brain and mind increase. And it's no surprise: the brain is responsible for the way we interact with the world, and the idea that ideas hone one another is not new to anyon…
 
Spheres and circles are simple objects. They are objects that are uniformly curved throughout in some way or another. They can also be defined as objects which have a boundary that is uniformly distant from some point, using some definition of distance. Circles and spheres were integral to the study of mathematics at least from the days of Euclid, …
 
Join Sofia and Gabriel on this problem episode where we explore "base 3-to-2" — a base system we explored on the last podcast — and how it relates to "base 3/2" from last episode. [Featuring: Sofía Baca; Gabriel Hesch] --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/appSupport this podcast: https://an…
 
A numerical base is a system of representing numbers using a sequence of symbols. However, like any mathematical concept, it can be extended and re-imagined in many different forms. A term used occasionally in mathematics is the term 'exotic', which just means 'different than usual in an odd or quirky way'. In this episode we are covering exotic ba…
 
Numbering was originally done with tally marks: the number of tally marks indicated the number of items being counted, and they were grouped together by fives. A little later, people wrote numbers down by chunking the number in a similar way into larger numbers: there were symbols for ten, ten times that, and so forth, for example, in ancient Egypt…
 
In Episode 10 of the Ethereal Podcast, DeFi Dad interviews the CoFounders of Mintbase, Nate Geier and Carolin Wend. Mintbase is an NFT factory for the new virtual economy. One can mint non-fungible tokens (NFTs) using Mintbase, which represent scarce digital goods like artwork. Artists using Mintbase, especially in virtual NFT worlds like Cryptovox…
 
In Episode 9 of the Ethereal Podcast, DeFi Dad interviews the CoFounder of Liquality, Simon Lapscher. The Liquality team built a protocol for enabling trustless cross-chain swaps between Bitcoin and Ethereum. You can use Liquality's swap at https://liquality.io/swap/ to trade BTC for ETH, DAI, USDC or go the other direction to trade back to BTC. Li…
 
In Episode 8 of the Ethereal Podcast, DeFi Dad interviews Head of Strategy and Business Operations at dYdX, Zhuoxun Yin. The dYdX team has been a leader in building the most dominant decentralized margin trading platform on Ethereum. In May 2020, they launched the first decentralized perpetual swap with 10X leverage for BTC-USDC on Ethereum. We dis…
 
In Episode 7 of the Ethereal Podcast, DeFi Dad interviews Ren Protocol CoFounder and CTO, Loong Wang. The RenVM aims to provide access to inter-blockchain liquidity for all decentralized applications. It has gained lots of attention from the Ethereum DeFi community for enabling a trustless swap of BTC to renBTC, which is an ERC20 token you can then…
 
Machines have been used to simplify labor since time immemorial, and simplify thought in the last few hundred years. We are at a point now where we have the electronic computer to aid us in our endeavor, which allows us to build hypothetical thinking machines by simply writing their blueprints — namely, the code that represents their function — in …
 
Machines, during the lifetime of anyone who is listening to this, have advanced and revolutionized the way that we live our lives. Many listening to this, for example, have lived through the rise of smart phones, 3d printing, massive advancements in lithium ion batteries, the Internet, robotics, and some have even lived through the introduction of …
 
In Episode 6 of the Ethereal Podcast, DeFi Dad interviews CoFounder of Opyn, Alexis Gauba. Alexis and her team launched the first DeFi platform on Ethereum for buying and selling put options for DeFi assets like DAI lent on Compound as well as the first on-chain put options for ETH. It's been a huge leap forward for the Ethereum and DeFi community …
 
Join Gabriel and Sofía as they delve into some introductory calculus concepts. [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch] Ways to support the show: -Visit our Sponsors: theGreatCoursesPlus.com/breakingmath Get a free month of the Great Courses Plus while supporting this show by clicking the link and signing up! brilliant.org/breakingmath Sign up at bri…
 
Time is something that everyone has an idea of, but is hard to describe. Roughly, the arrow of time is the same as the arrow of causality. However, what happens when that is not the case? It is so often the case in our experience that this possibility brings not only scientific and mathematic, but ontological difficulties. So what is retrocausality…
 
Sofia is still recovering from eye surgery, so this will be a rerun. We'll probably be back next week. The idea of something that is inescapable, at first glance, seems to violate our sense of freedom. This sense of freedom, for many, seems so intrinsic to our way of seeing the universe that it seems as though such an idea would only beget horror i…
 
Learn more about radiative forcing, the environment, and how global temperature changes with atmospheric absorption with this Problem Episode about you walking your (perhaps fictional?) dog around a park. This episode is distributed under a CC BY-SA license. For more information, visit CreativeCommons.org. [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch] ---…
 
Since time immemorial, blacksmiths have known that the hotter metal gets, the more it glows: it starts out red, then gets yellower, and then eventually white. In 1900, Max Planck discovered the relationship between an ideal object's radiation of light and its temperature. A hundred and twenty years later, we're using the consequences of this discov…
 
Climate change is an issue that has become frighteningly more relevant in recent years, and because of special interests, the field has become muddied with climate change deniers who use dishonest tactics to try to get their message across. The website SkepticalScience.com is one line of defense against these messengers, and it was created and main…
 
Mathematics, like any intellectual pursuit, is a constantly-evolving field; and, like any evolving field, there are both new beginnings and sudden unexpected twists, and things take on both new forms and new responsibilities. Today on the show, we're going to cover a few mathematical topics whose nature has changed over the centuries. So what does …
 
Learn more about calculus, derivatives, and the chain rule with this Problem Episode about you walking your (perhaps fictional?) dog around a park. This episode is distributed under a CC BY-SA license. For more information, visit CreativeCommons.org. [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch] --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way t…
 
Ben Orlin has been a guest on the show before. He got famous with a blog called 'Math With Bad Drawings", which is what it says on the tin: he teaches mathematics using his humble drawing skills. His last book was a smorgasbord of different mathematical topics, but he recently came out with a new book 'Change is the Only Constant: the Wisdom of Cal…
 
On this problem episode, join Sofía and guest Diane Baca to learn about what an early attempt to formalize the natural numbers has to say about whether or not m+n equals n+m. This episode is distributed under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/) --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a…
 
Statistics is a field that is considered boring by a lot of people, including a huge amount of mathematicians. This may be because the history of statistics starts in a sort of humdrum way: collecting information on the population for use by the state. However, it has blossomed into a beautiful field with its fundamental roots in measure theory, an…
 
Children who are being taught mathematics often balk at the idea of negative numbers, thinking them to be fictional entities, and often only learn later that they are useful for expressing opposite extremes of things, such as considering a debt an amount of money with a negative sum. Similarly, students of mathematics often are puzzled by the idea …
 
A calendar is a system of dividing up time into manageable chunks so that we can reference how long ago something happened, agree on times to do things in the future, and generally just have a sense of reckoning time. This can be as simple as recognizing the seasons of the year, as arcane as the Roman Republican calendar, or as accurate as atomic c…
 
We communicate every day through languages; not only human languages, but other things that could be classified as languages such as internet protocols, or even the structure of business transactions. The structure of words or sentences, or their metaphorical equivalents, in that language is known as their syntax. There is a way to describe certain…
 
Game theory is all about decision-making and how it is impacted by choice of strategy, and a strategy is a decision that is influenced not only by the choice of the decision-maker, but one or more similar decision makers. This episode will give an idea of the type of problem-solving that is used in game theory. So what is strict dominance? How can …
 
Hello listeners. You don't know me, but I know you. I want to play a game. In your ears are two earbuds. Connected to the earbuds are a podcast playing an episode about game theory. Hosting that podcast are two knuckleheads. And you're locked into this episode. The key is at the end of the episode. What is game theory? Why did we parody the Saw fra…
 
Breaking Math will return with a third season in early February with an episode series about game theory starting with "The One where they Parody 'Saw'". We also talk about some upcoming news and such. Until then, enjoy in-the-works podcast "The Soapbox: a Podcast about Speech and Debate" by Santa Fe Trail Media (our parent organization), which is …
 
Math is a gravely serious topic which has been traditionally been done by stodgy people behind closed doors, and it cannot ever be taken lightly. Those who have fun with mathematics mock science, medicine, and the foundation of engineering. That is why on today's podcast, we're going to have absolutely no fun with mathematics. There will not be a s…
 
Centuries ago, there began something of a curiosity between mathematicians that didn't really amount to much but some interesting thoughts and cool mathematical theorems. This form of math had to do with strictly integer quantities; theorems about whole numbers. Things started to change in the 19th century with some breakthroughs in decrypting inte…
 
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