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The Arch and Anth Podcast aims to provides entertaining and educational content about archaeology and anthropology. Hosting the show is Dr Michael B. C. Rivera, an expert in the study of human biology, human behavior and human societies worldwide, from the earliest beginnings to modern times. Episodes come out every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, featuring a special guest talking about their work. More info at: http://archandanth.com/
 
Kris Pope, from Coyote Trapping School, provides instruction and educational content for people interested in getting started, or getting better, at trapping furbearers and predators. Many people consider trapping a dying art, but there is still plenty of interest whether from outdoorsmen and women who are looking to further their outdoor skills, wildlife managers looking to enhance game populations through predator control, or survivalists interesting in knowing how to obtain food and fur i ...
 
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In this episode I review the different types of sets for coyotes and go over some coyote trapping basics, mainly sets, dirthole, flat, and scent post. Hopefully providing good information for beginner and experienced trappers alike. I also touch on an update to think mink cull we talked about last episode in Denmark. To get a Shortliner Trapping Ba…
 
In this episode I touch quickly on what could be a major impact on the fur market, related to COVID. Then I go through a general overview of coyote biology and behavior. As trappers, we should be experts on the game that we pursue, so I thought it might be helpful to review some data regarding coyotes, hopefully to improve our effectiveness as trap…
 
In this episode I talk about eating furbearer meat. If you’re a trapper or hunter, odds are that you’ve at least considered eating various wild game. I think eating some of the meat we catch is a great opportunity to introduce others to wild game as well as give us some additional arguments to those who don’t approve of trapping. The fact is, when …
 
In this episode I answer some listener questions. I also talk a little about fur tanning (I just got my Texas furs back from the tannery!) and just some general trapper rambling. I hope you enjoy, I’ve got some interviews in the lineup that I’m pretty excited about so stay tuned and if your season has already come in, good luck! To get your hands o…
 
In this week’s episode I dig into some trapper survey data and find some historical data of trapper harvest from several different states, some dating back to the 1930s. It is very interesting data and highlights how important it is for trappers to accurately respond to those surveys. Our game agencies rely on us for good data, and if we don’t prov…
 
In this episode I have a deep discussion with Kyle Waltz of Conserv Wildlife Services. We talk in depth about Kyle’s business model and specifically the opportunity to partner with Conserv if you have or are wanting to start a wildlife control business. It is a very interesting conversation and certainly gives a wildlife control operator some thing…
 
In this episode I interview Ryan Carpenter, one of the R’s of R and R Trading Post. Ryan and his wife, Renee, have a fur sewing business in Pennsylvania. We talk about a wide range of topics including how Ryan got started trapping and how they got started in the fur sewing business. I love seeing our fur get used here locally instead of being shipp…
 
There are a lot more benefits to trapping than a fur check, which is a good thing in times like these when fur checks are slim to non existant! There are plenty of things that trapping teaches you, and the network and connections you make as a trapper can unlock opportunities that you may have never otherwise been able to take advantage of. As we a…
 
This is an interview with Kyle Kaatz about gland removal. Depending on the species the value of glands can really add up and by adding an extra couple minutes we can increase the yield from the trapline. To see the latest prices Kaatz Bros is paying for glands visit https://www.kaatzbros.com/reports/glands-essence-castor-and-carcasses-wanted/ We al…
 
In this episode I talk about one of the most important things in my life, my faith. I believe that we were put on this earth by our Heavenly Father, and that through His son, Jesus Christ, our sins have been forgiven and we can have a personal relationship with God. And one of the most important things in that relationship is spreading the Gospel a…
 
In this episode I share some of my findings and hopefully some helpful tips and tricks that I’ve picked up since I started doing leatherwork, particularly making beavertail items. I’ve had a good bit of success with the small effort I’ve put into it and have no doubt that it can be replicated. There are plenty of good resources on YouTube and other…
 
Today I interview Bobby Dale Boyles, a Kentucky trapper. We cover a wide range of topics, one of the most interesting may be his tanning process. After talking with him I may have to try tanning again. You’re sure to enjoy this episode, non stop trapping talk! You can follow him on Instagram @bobbydaleboyles Trapping season is coming quickly, be su…
 
In this episode I talk with NY trapper Linda White, to get a different perspective on trapping. We talk about how Linda and her husband run their trapline and bait and lure business, Sawmill Creek Bait and Lures, https://www.sawmillcreekbaitandlures.com/, which also lead to Linda starting Trapping Girl Inc, https://www.trappinggirlinc.com/. We disc…
 
In this episode I interview South Carolina trapper Bill Smith. We talk about beach trapping, another example of how trapping is conservation, along with gator trapping, and crawfish trapping, just to name a few things. Bill is a down to earth guy and you will enjoy this interview. You can follow him on instagram @coastal_land_and_wildlife. Trapping…
 
In this episode I talk about some of my gator hunting and trapping stories from years past. Man I wish I had a video camera along back then, that would have made some great videos, but the least I can do is share some of these stories and hope that you get as much enjoyment out of them as I do reliving them. Trapping season is coming quickly, be su…
 
In this episode I talk about some of the trapping resources that are available, and beneficial, for beginner and seasoned trappers alike. In today’s age there is more access to information than ever, some good, some just so-so. Here are a few of the good resources out there! As always, be sure to support our sponsors, Kaatz Bros Lures, www.kaatzbro…
 
In this episode I talk about my experience trapping invasive foxes on an Aleutian island in Alaska. It was quite the adventure and also quite the conservation success story. Since the 1940s there has been an initiative to remove the nonnative foxes from islands and restore them to seabird nesting grounds. Not just helping all seabirds populations b…
 
On this episode, Dr. Massimo Lando (City University of Hong Kong) hosts the show and interviews Dr. Michael B. C. Rivera (The Arch and Anth Podcast) about the move they're making to Hong Kong, and their reflections on the life they've led together since the launch of the podcast in May 2019. Michael created The Arch and Anth Podcast on May 13th, 20…
 
Today, Stefan Milosavljevich (Stefan Milo on YouTube) talks to us about his inspiration and process of creating YouTube videos all about archaeology, anthropology and human evolution. How did Stefan get started on YouTube and what first inspired him to start doing videos on his passion subjects of archaeology and anthropology? What does he believe …
 
On today's episode, Dr. Lena Karvovskaya (Utrecht University) is on the podcast to talk about her current work as a research data manager, as well as her earlier PhD research studying theoretical linguistics and the grammar of possession. In complex data management, how does Lena work with users with projects that need new connections? In what ways…
 
Aqeel Ihsan (York University) is a history PhD candidate focusing on South Asian diaspora currently living in Canada. Topics of Aqeel's interest include South Asian diaspora's memories of the 1947 partition of India into two republics (now India and Pakistan), concepts of 'home' and 'belonging', and how grocery stores, restaurants and kitchens at h…
 
In this episode, Dr. Katie Tucker (The Solomonic-Zagwe Encounters Project) takes us through her multitudes of osteoarchaeological research experiences, beginning with The SolZag Project that centers upon the interactions between the Zagwe Kingdom (900 - 1270) and the Solomonic Dynasty (1270 - 1974). For Katie's work at the Gännätä Maryam Rock Churc…
 
For this episode, Dr. Abidemi Babatunde Babalola (University of Cambridge) was interviewed about his work on the history of early glass production in West Africa, as evidenced through excavations at the site of Igbo Olokun in the Yoruba city of Ile-Ife in southwestern Nigeria. As a Smuts Research Fellow at Cambridge's Center of African Studies, Tun…
 
In this episode I talk with Frank Cisa, of Wildman Wildlife Removal & Exclusion, https://www.wildmantrapping.com/. We discuss a variety of items from tools to trapping tactics, and how Frank has grown his business. Frank is still a relatively new Wildlife Control Operator, but he is definitely doing something right as his business is growing and he…
 
For this edition of the podcast, Sofia Carrera (University of Michigan) is on the show to speak about her new research looking at how early life adversity affects health, hormones and development, with her newest paper out speaking on these themes in the study of gelada monkeys. What is the landscape like in the Ethiopian Highlands, and how do gela…
 
Today, Dr. Noel Hidalgo Tan (SoutheastAsianArchaeology.com; Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre; SEAMEO SPAFA) is on the show to talk about public outreach, rock art and building capacity in regional archaeology in Southeast Asia. Noel currently works with the education and culture departments in Bangkok, Thailand, as part of the work done by the Southeast As…
 
In this episode, Dr. Sarah Son (University of Sheffield) introduces us to her work in Korean studies, performing human rights research and monitoring, and investigating news reporting and media, popular culture and social movements, as well as nation-building, identity, security and peace-building on the Korean Peninsula. What career and personal l…
 
On this episode of the Arch and Anth Podcast, Joshua Kumbani (Recentring AfroAsia; University of the Witwatersrand) talks about his work in music archaeology, ethnomusicology and experimental archaeology, studying the evidence of Later Stone Age artefacts used for music-making from the southern Cape of South Africa. How long ago does the study of m…
 
In this episode I discuss some of the aspects of sales and selling in a wildlife control business. I explain how I’ve encountered and experienced that it is really more of a wildlife exclusion business, from a cash flow and efficiency standpoint. And several different approaches when selling to a customer. Ultimately it boils down to how well you s…
 
For this episode, Dr. Krishna Balasubramaniam (UC Davis) takes us through his research on behavioral ecology, human-wildlife interactions, primate health and disease and primate social evolution, studying both wild species living in urban and peri-urban settings, as well as captive monkeys. What is behavioral ecology and why are behavioral ecologic…
 
In this episode, Dr. Cara Ocobock (University of Notre Dame) talks to us about her investigations in human biology, anatomy, physiology, evolution, energetics and environmental adaptation. One the main projects she is involved in assesses cold adaptations among reindeer herders in Finland. What are the daily and seasonal activities of reindeer herd…
 
To close out the week, Carmen Lucia Cano Roca (University of Nebraska-Lincoln) is on the show to share her work in food science, food safety and Salmonella microbiology. Which multiple disciplines does food science draw from? For her PhD research, how does Carmen study how risks of Salmonella infection can be better controlled? How did Carmen take …
 
On this episode, Jayson Maurice Porter (Northwestern University) talks about Mexican ecological history, the tropical histories of medicine, technology and agriculture, Black and Latinx geographies, and how social and political manifestations of violence are intertwined with relationships between people and environment. What early life experiences …
 
In this episode, Dr. Orisanmi Burton (American University) calls in from Washington, D.C. to share his view on the Black Lives Matter movement this week, speaking as a social anthropologist who examines state repression, grassroots organization and the Black radical demands generated within U.S. prisons that imagine alternative futures. What import…
 
Imani Strong-Tucker (Griffin & Strong, P.C.; London School of Economics' International Inequalities Institute) is Operations Manager for a team conducting disparity studies and demographic and anecdotal data analyses. We talk about the Black Lives Matter movement, affirmative action policy in the U.S. and the various ways systemic racism keep Black…
 
In this episode I discuss a few different options for generating leads or calls for your wildlife control business. One key in my opinion is that you must be online, so you need a website. Then it boils down to whether you want to buy leads or generate them organically. Both options work but organic leads take more time to grow. I think its a good …
 
In her work, Kyle Marian Viterbo (Science Friday; The Symposium: Academic StandUp) works and runs events mainly centered around science comedy, science writing and social media communication, racial and social justice advocacy, striving to decolonize the way science is performs, and supporting academics in their studies and research. How did Kyle m…
 
On this episode, we have Bill Auchter (Archaeothoughts; ArchaeoRPG) to talk about his career journey from bank teller to cultural resources manager, then from telecommunications archaeologist to archaeogamer. What is the history of Maryland, where Bill is based? How was he inspired by the Smithsonian museums closeby in Washington, D.C.? Why did Bil…
 
In this episode I review the recent NWCOA training I took. Their Wildlife Control Operator course is a basic course that covers a wide range of topics geared toward new Wildlife Control Operators (WCOs). If you are new to, or thinking about starting as a WCO I highly recommend this course. The best part was this session was taught online, so travel…
 
In this episode, Dr. Anna Ploszajski ('rial Talk; Handmade) is on the show to talk about her recent work so far in materials science, academia, science podcasting, science comedy and popular science book writing. What do materials scientists research, and what can we understand about different materials' properties by looking at their atomic struct…
 
In this episode I talk with Daniel Dekeyzer, a Georgia trapper who also runs a successful nuisance trapping business on the side. We talk about how he got started, where he gets business from, and in general how he runs his jobs. Gives a little more insight into how different trappers run their businesses. As always, be sure to support our sponsors…
 
Today, Jianne Soriano (Youth4IG, Cinema Escapist, Hong Konger Project) is on the show to talk all about her work so far on youth and internet governance, as well as promoting ethnic minority rights and stories in Hong Kong. A journalism graduate of Hong Kong's Baptist University, Jianne now writes, collaborates and creates online content for the ca…
 
On this episode, Gaby Lapera (Credit Karma) is on the show to talk about her exciting new podcast called the AnthroBiology Podcast, and how she was inspired to merge her earlier education in anthropology with her experiences working in online content creation and editing to start this science communication production. Gaby graduated with an MA in A…
 
Today, Dr. Akin Ogundiran (UNC Charlotte) talks to us about the archaeology of social complexity and cultural history in the Yoruba world, the heritage sector in Nigeria, and his collaborative projects on the archaeology of Atlantic Africa and the African Diaspora. What transdisciplinary approaches and theories does Akin incorporate in his thirty y…
 
On today's episode, Dr. Stephen Maclean (University of Edinburgh) is on the podcast to talk about his experiences of transitioning from an anatomy student to an anatomy researcher to now an anatomy lecturer, co-ordinating classes on general anatomy, human osteology and the musculoskeletal system. How is anatomy typically taught through lectures and…
 
Dr. Anna Goldfield (SAPIENS, The Dirt Podcast, Cosumnes River College, UC Davis) is an anthropology lecturer, zooarchaeologist, podcaster, popular science writer, enthusiast of all things human and science communicator. On this episode, we talk about her foray so far into the world of archaeology, anthropology and online communications. Anna receiv…
 
In this episode, Pooja Swali (The Francis Crick Institute) takes us through her research using metagenomics techniques and approaches to study ancient pathogens, with an eye towards helping to measure and control infectious disease spread. At what point did Pooja first fall in love with archaeology, genetics and anthropology, and what was her path …
 
For this episode, Alexandra Kralick (University of Pennsylvania) talks to us about her research looking at great ape skeletal growth and development, ideas about sex differences in humans and other primates, and the biological anthropology science communication work she does online. What are the main differences between skeletons of the various gre…
 
For this edition of the podcast, Sgt. Nathan Tilton (University of California, Berkeley) is on the show to speak about his undergraduate course in anthropology, his work in disability research, and his ethnographic studies of military veteran experiences. Nate is a Lab Manager at the UC Berkeley Disability Lab, a makerspace where disability researc…
 
Today, Dr. Christina Cheung (Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle) is on the show to talk all about stable isotope analyses and reconstructing what subsistence strategies ancient people were using in prehistoric China, especially around the time of the Shang Dynasty (13th to 11th century BCE). Why is the site of Yin Xu, the capital of Shang Dynasty…
 
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