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Two British lifelong Harry Potter fans Hannah and Charlie re-read their favourite childhood book chapter by chapter with added alcohol and cynicism in fortnightly episodes! The perfect podcast for HP fans who want to revisit the story through an adult lens (AKA, NSFW), and with the added bonus of British accents, Hannah and Charlie lovingly tear apart the books pointing out plot holes, anti-feminist moments, transphobia, fat phobia, and most of all...dick jokes. A unique combination of intel ...
 
The purpose of DIBTB is to criticize and analyze literary works of romance fiction and spread sexual awareness in society. As with all literary criticisms, the main part of taking apart these works is to reflect on society and the human condition. By reading and accessing the books on the show, I hope to bring my listeners to a better understanding of our society and themselves.
 
THE BIBLIO FILE is one of the world's leading podcasts about "the book" and an inquiry into the wider world of book culture. Hosted by Nigel Beale it features wide ranging conversations with authors, poets, book publishers, booksellers, book editors, book collectors, book makers, book scholars, book critics, book designers, book publicists, literary agents and other certified bibliophiles.
 
In The God Setebos podcast, the editors of Xi Draconis Books (Patrick Barney, Chris Malmberg, and Hans Burger) review and discuss novels, short story collections, poetry, and other forms of literature. They also explore literary criticism and philosophy to some extent, as well as the occasional episode on music. Xi Draconis Books is an anarchist indie press that publishes socially engaged literature. As a statement against commodification, all the books that XDB publishes are free to readers ...
 
The Naval Institute is a private, not-for-profit educational institution whose mission is to provide an independent forum for those who dare to read, think, speak, and write to advance the professional, literary, and scientific understanding of sea power and other issues critical to global security. Every week on the Proceedings Podcast, the Naval Institute's Director of Outreach, Ward Carroll, and the Editor-in-Chief of Proceedings, Bill Hamblet, talk about what's happening in the Sea Servi ...
 
Through wide ranging conversations with philosophers, literary critics, artists, and theologians, philosopher Jennifer A. Frey explores the nature of love and happiness as depicted in important works of literature, poetry, and film.Our project is supported by a generous grant from the John Templeton Foundation and housed at the University of Chicago.
 
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was a German writer and statesman. His body of work includes epic and lyric poetry written in a variety of metres and styles; prose and verse dramas; memoirs; an autobiography; literary and aesthetic criticism; treatises on botany, anatomy, and colour; and four novels. In addition, numerous literary and scientific fragments, more than 10,000 letters, and nearly 3,000 drawings by him are extant. - Summary by Wikipedia
 
Few literary terms are more hotly debated, discounted, or derided than the "Great American Novel." But while critics routinely dismiss the phrase as at best hype and as at worst exclusionary, the belief that a national literature commensurate with both the scope and the contradictions of being American persists. In this podcast Scott Yarbrough and Kirk Curnutt examine totemic works such as Herman Melville's Moby-Dick and Toni Morrison's Beloved that have been labeled GANs, exploring their th ...
 
This is Mark Twain's vicious and amusing review of Fenimore Cooper's literary art. It is still read widely in academic circles. Twain's essay, Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses (often spelled "Offences") (1895), particularly criticized The Deerslayer and The Pathfinder. Twain wrote at the beginning of the essay: 'In one place in Deerslayer, and in the restricted space of two-thirds of a page, Cooper has scored 114 offenses against literary art out of a possible 115. It breaks the record.' ...
 
"I think that I shall never see, a poem as lovely as a tree; A tree whose hungry mouth is presd against the sweet earth's flowing breast ...". Almost all of us, including myself of course, have heard and enjoyed those famous words which begin Kilmer's poem, Trees. There is even a National Forest in the United States named in honor of this poem. Here is a recording of the entire book of poems in which it was first published in 1914. Joyce Kilmer was an American writer and poet mainly remember ...
 
Warlord of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs was first published in 1913. It was the third book in an eleven part series known as the Barsoom Chronicles which relate to a sequence of exciting adventure tales set on the fictional planet of Barsoom. In the Barsoom series, Mars, assumed to be older than Earth, is a dying planet. “Barsoom” is the native word for Mars in the Martian language. The stories first appeared in serialized form in various magazines like All-Story, Argosy, Amazing Stories and ...
 
The Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities (IASH) in the University of Queensland is dedicated to high level research in a range of humanities disciplines with a focus on Intellectual and Literary History, Critical and Cultural Studies, the History of Emotions, and Science and Society. It has a core of permanent research-focused academics and postdoctoral researchers working on specific projects, and hosts short stay Faculty and Visiting Fellows.
 
Novel Not New is a visual novel game club with a queer focus and a casual bent. Every month, join Jen Unkle, Six Dettmar, and Olivia Joseph for a critical and fun conversation about a new visual novel game. Our favorites will be dated, murders will be solved, lives will be lived, and all bad ends will be expunged from memory as we read our way through this most literary of video game genres. Novel is right in the name!
 
An atypical piece of writing by Mark Twain, the short bawdy skit documents a conversion between Queen Elizabeth and several notable writers of the time, including Sir Walter Raleigh, Francis Beaumont, Ben Jonson, and William Shakespeare. Despite first being published in 1880, the piece remained anonymous for a period of time, until it was later acknowledged by Twain in 1901 as his own. Comprised of humor, descriptive imagery, ribald connotations, and vulgar language, the faux conversation is ...
 
Pullstring Press is a media publisher in Santa Barbara California. Pullstring maintains offices in the grand Balboa Building on State Street in downtown. The press publishes a literary quarterly and a podcast network. Mail is always welcome with comment or criticism at 735 State Street Suite 111 Santa Barbara CA 93101.
 
Dream Tower Media's critically acclaimed monthly podcast featuring fascinating and fun conversations with authors and artists of fantasy, magic realism and science fiction, plus amusing skits, quips, and sound effects. In addition, approximately twice a year, fully produced audio adventures of fantastic stories are presented. Hosted by Robert Zoltan and his sidekick Edgar the Raven in the Dream Tower.
 
Fenimore Cooper - author of The Deerslayer, The Last of the Mohicans, etc - has often been praised, but just as often been criticised for his writing. Mark Twain wrote a funny, vicious little essay on the subject, in which he states: "In one place in 'Deerslayer,' and in the restricted space of two-thirds of a page, Cooper has scored 114 offences against literary art out of a possible 115." (Summary by Gesine)
 
If you've read and loved Alice in Wonderland, you wouldn't want to miss reading about her further adventures, the strange and fantastical creatures she meets and the delightful style and word-play that made the first book so appealing. Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll is thematically much more structured and cleverly constructed as compared to the earlier Alice book but still retains its childhood elements of wonder, curiosity and imagination. Lewis Carroll was the pseudonym of Rev ...
 
A lively mix of author interviews, audio book previews and chats with those influential in the literary world, The Book Report has become appointment listening for bibliophiles and book clubs alike. It's a great way to find out who's hot in the book world and which titles critics and readers are buzzing about. Come back and see updated shows weekly!
 
Salon has partnered with the critically acclaimed variety show, Cabinet of Wonders, to launch the companion podcast for the event series. Hosted by celebrated author and singer/songwriter Wesley Stace, the Cabinet of Wonders podcast brings together collaborators from the worlds of music, literature and comedy – for one night only, whenever you like.
 
Margaret Steele Anderson was born in Louisville, Kentucky in 1867 and was educated in the public school of Louisville, with special courses at Wellesley College. From 1901 Miss Anderson was Literary Editor of the `Evening Post' of Louisville, and was known as one of the most discriminating critics of the South. She published only one volume of verse, "The Flame in the Wind", 1914. (David Lawrence
 
An old monk is tricked by the Devil into undertaking a voyage to a remote island to save the souls of thousands who live there. He arrives on the island which is actually a desolate one, inhabited only by colonies of millions of penguins. The old monk whose eyesight and hearing are almost nonexistent, mistakes them for humans and begins baptizing them. In Heaven, God finds Himself in a dilemma; the old monk's unwavering faith compels him to regard the baptisms as genuine. However, in Christi ...
 
“I know not what tomorrow will bring – The Fernando Pessoa audiotour” is a documentary series dedicated to Fernando Pessoa. Pessoa’s story is told in 15 episodes. Each chapter was created having in mind a geographical location in Lisbon, Portugal, so the listener can experience it in two different ways: through a physical journey or through an imaginary journey. Each episode crosses biographical and literary key aspects of Fernando Pessoa and can be listened independently. The story is told ...
 
One of the longest-running books shows on Australian radio, Final Draft is a space on the air where big names of arts and culture sit cheek-by-jowl with those just beginning to make their mark. Produced in the hope of inspiring generous, open-minded reading and discussion, the show features guests and writing from around Australia and the world. Each week we serve up a mix of interviews with writers, reviews of new, classic and cult titles, readings of original work, short features and docum ...
 
A social satire, Main Street became a best-seller soon after its publication, fascinating readers with its biting humor and realistic portrayal of small-town communities. Published in 1920, the novel follows Carol Milford as she moves to a conventional small town, where she encounters its conceited residents characterized by their ignorance, hypocrisy, and smugness, while simultaneously being the target of their careless ridicule. Furthermore, the novel efficiently exemplifies the dividing l ...
 
Take one genre, two combative critics, five authors angling to break out of the pack and what have you got? “Blurb!” – the new book show that’s anything but bookish. Each week, bibliophiles Sally Shields and Dr. Kent review not books themselves but prerecorded pitches from five writers whose literary works are hot off the presses. And each has got a mere three minutes to convince the hosts that theirs is the one worth cracking. But if they succeed, they capture the coveted Book of the Week t ...
 
Johan August Strindberg was a Swedish playwright who has had many of his works read into Librivox by volunteers. From his earliest work, Strindberg developed forms of dramatic action, language, and visual composition so innovative that many were to become technically possible to stage only with the advent of film. He is considered the "father" of modern Swedish literature. The Growth of a Soul is Strindberg's own literary autobiography and recreation of the spirit of the times at Upsala Univ ...
 
THE HEPTAMERON, first published posthumously in 1558, is divided into seven complete days containing 10 stories each, and an eighth day containing only 2 stories. The stories, many of which deal with love and infidelity, resulted in "accusations of looseness" by critics of the day. The author, Margaret of Navarre (also known as Margaret of Angoulême) became an influential woman in the intellectual and cultural circles of the French Renaissance. From an 1892 essay by the translator George Sai ...
 
THE HEPTAMERON (here Volume 3 of 5), first published posthumously in 1558, is divided into seven complete days containing 10 stories each, and an eighth day containing only 2 stories. The stories, many of which deal with love and infidelity, resulted in "accusations of looseness" by critics of the day. The author, Margaret of Navarre (also known as Margaret of Angoulême) became an influential woman in the intellectual and cultural circles of the French Renaissance. From an 1892 essay by the ...
 
The strands woven together in Gustave Flaubert's famous, path breaking 1856 novel Madame Bovary include a provincial town in Normandy, France, a shy young doctor with an indifferent career and a lovely young woman who lives in a fantasy world based on the innumerable romantic novels she reads. Of course there is also the story of a dull marriage punctuated by passionate, adulterous love affairs. First published in serial form in a Parisian magazine and deemed to be the “perfect” novel, Flaub ...
 
A wealthy philanthropist adopts an abandoned baby he finds in a railway station waiting room. The child grows into a fine, upstanding young man. When his benefactor dies, he is made the guardian of the old man's lovely young daughter. But unknown to everyone, he leads a double life that even his best friend knows nothing about... If you thought that this has all the makings of a most sinister and diabolical plot, you couldn't be more mistaken. The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde i ...
 
Christmas Eve. Guests round a fireside begin telling each other ghost stories. One of them relates a true incident involving the governess of his little nephew and niece. Strange events begin to take place, involving the housekeeper, a stranger who prowls round the grounds, a mysterious woman dressed in black and an unknown misdemeanor committed by the little nephew. The Turn of the Screw by Henry James was published in 1893 and it remains one of the best-known and admired works of this grea ...
 
An epistolary novel, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall follows the courageous journey of the protagonist, Helen Graham, as she struggles to escape her socially imposed role as dutiful wife, while also acting on her moral responsibilities as a mother and self-respect as a woman. Published in 1848, under the pseudonym Acton Bell, the novel provoked much criticism at the time of its release due to its shocking content and atypical portrayal of an English wife, who not only defies the strict conventio ...
 
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show series
 
Louis Menand’s new book, “The Free World: Art and Thought in the Cold War,” covers the interchange of arts and ideas between the United States and Europe in the decades following World War II. On this week’s podcast, Menand talks about the book, including why he chose to frame his telling from the end of the war until 1965. “What I didn’t get right…
 
On the eve of its seventieth birthday, Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man (1952) occupies a unique place in the American canon. On the one hand, it was instantly heralded as a Great American Novel---indeed, as Lawrence Buell notes in his study of GANs, it was the first novel by an African American to be universally admitted to the pantheon of important …
 
Ello ello ello! It's another episodeeeeeee. In todays ep we're chatting about chapters 20 & 21 of OOTP. Charlie resets the vibe in a...creative way, and we comment on how wizards make themselves the centre of attention with everything, giants, and how Cho so relatably goes from crying to horny in 0.2 seconds. Merch www.gobletofwine.co.uk patreon.co…
 
Dwight Garner is an American journalist and a longtime writer and editor for the New York Times. In 2008, he was named a book critic for the newspaper. Garner's previous post at The New York Times was as senior editor of The New York Times Book Review, where he worked from 1999 to 2008. He was a founding editor of Salon.com where he worked from 199…
 
In 2018, Michael Lewis published “The Fifth Risk,” which argued, in short, that the federal government was underprepared for a variety of disaster scenarios. Guess what his new book is about? Lewis visits the podcast this week to discuss “The Premonition,” which recounts the initial response to the coronavirus pandemic. “It wasn’t just Trump,” Lewi…
 
Mark Samuels Lasner is a Senior Research Fellow at the University of Delaware Library, and one of the world's great book collectors. The Mark Samuels Lasner Collection focuses on British literature and art from 1850 to 1900, with an emphasis on the Pre-Raphaelites and writers and illustrators of the 1890s. It comprises more than 9,500 books, letter…
 
The original Deep Trouble was one of the best selling Goosebumps books in the series and also won the prestigious Nickelodeon Kids' Choice Award. The fans wanted more, so RLS delivered. The Deep family are in deep sh*t again. No mermaids this time, but I'm pretty sure Sheena gets swallowed by a female reproductive organ. I don't know, just read it.…
 
In her new book, “Antitrust,” Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota explores the history of fighting monopoly power in this country, and argues that the digital age calls for a renewed effort. “I think the best way to do this right now is to have our laws be as sophisticated as the companies that we’re dealing with,” Klobuchar says on this week’s podc…
 
WE'RE BACK TOGETHER! Covid 19 rules now allow for 'non-essential' businesses to open, which apparently, our podcast is 'non-essential'? Who knew. So with some sexy social distancing rules in place we're FINALLY recording together again! We're chatting about chapters 18 & 19 of OOTP whilst drinking a literal TUB of alcohol. We discuss Harry and Ron'…
 
Experiencing heart palpitations and chest pains, Captain Rob Francis convinced himself they were the result of medications he was taking or something he ate—until he was in full cardiac arrest. His message: Take care of yourself.More here: https://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings/2021/march/warrior-spirit-fickle-heart…
 
Patrick Radden Keefe’s new book, “Empire of Pain,” is a history of the Sacklers, the family behind Purdue Pharma, the creator of the powerful painkiller OxyContin, which became the root of the opioid crisis in the United States. One of the subjects covered in Keefe’s investigative work is what the company knew, and when, as the crisis began to unfo…
 
The Great American Novel podcast is an ongoing discussion about the novels we hold up as significant achievements in our American literary culture. Additionally, we sometimes suggest novels who should break into the sometimes problematical canon and at other times we’ll suggest books which can be dropped from such lofty consideration. Your hosts ar…
 
David Frum is a Canadian-American political commentator and a senior editor at The Atlantic. He is the author of ten books, most recently TRUMPOCALYPSE: Restoring American Democracy (HarperCollins, 2020). His first book, Dead Right, won praise from William F. Buckley as “the most refreshing intellectual experience in a generation” and from Frank Ri…
 
Odette Drapeau is a leader, educator and innovator in the practice of fine bookbinding. She founded her bookbinding workshop The Headband in Montreal in 1979. For more than 50 years she has refined her work though the innovative use of materials including fish leathers, high-tech fibres and LED lights. Through her creative use of stunning textures …
 
We’ve been in celebration mode all week as the Book Review’s podcast turns 15 years old. Pamela Paul shared 15 of her favorite episodes since she began hosting in 2013. We chose 10 other memorable conversations from the show’s full archives, and did a bit of digging to tell the story of the podcast’s earliest days. Now, appropriately, we cap things…
 
The Ilteris brothers, Captain Steve and Commander Mike, discuss how a 21st-century antisubmarine task group could bring the fleet a substantial increase in capability, operational flexibility, and lethality.More here: https://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings/2021/april/resurrect-hunter-killer-group…
 
In today's episode, we're talking about chapter 17 of Order of the Pheonix, how Hogwarts needs a sex room, how problematic the staircase slide is, and what a ridiculous amount of male violence there is in Harry Potter. Merch www.gobletofwine.co.uk patreon.com/gobletofwine Twitter.com/gobletofwinepod Instagram.com/gobletofwinepodcast www.facebook.co…
 
Only seventeen women have won the Nobel Prize for Literature since it started in 1901. That's 17 out of 119 winners. In order to rectify this imbalance, an important new prize has been established. The Carol Shields Prize for Fiction is "the first English-language literary award to celebrate creativity and excellence in fiction by women writers in …
 
Blake Bailey’s long-awaited biography of Philip Roth has generated renewed conversation about the life and work of the towering American novelist who died at 85 in 2018. Bailey visits the podcast this week to take part in that conversation himself. “Most of Philip’s life was spent in this little cottage in the woods of Connecticut, standing at a de…
 
Historian Andy Blackley talks about the naval defeat inflicted by Japan in the 1890s that left China with wounded pride that has influenced how that country is rebuilding its Navy today.More here: https://www.usni.org/magazines/naval-history-magazine/2021/april/enduring-legacy-war-jiawuAv U.S. Naval Institute
 
Dan Mozersky enjoyed a long and fruitful career in Canada's retail book industry. As a founding member of Indigo Books & Music's executive team he was instrumental in turning the company's vision into reality. During the 1990s he served as manager of U.S. Operations for Classic Books in New York. Prior to this he founded and owned a chain of retail…
 
You can fit so many dead kids in this cold, cold lake. RL Stine is sick of letting children live in book 56 and starts swinging the scythe around! If things weren't spooky enough, Ashley of Lloyd's Pub Podcast (@lloyds_pub_podcast) joins Matt and Dave to discuss the book and her ghostly experiences (she is super haunted).…
 
In his new book, “Life’s Edge,” Carl Zimmer asks the modest questions: What is life? How did it begin? And by what criteria can we define things as “living”? On this week’s podcast, Zimmer, a science columnist for The Times, talks about just how difficult it can be to find answers. “There are actually philosophers who have argued that maybe we shou…
 
Bill Waiser is a western Canadian historian. He has published more than a dozen books– many of them prize-winning. A World We Have Lost: Saskatchewan Before 1905, for example, won the 2016 Governor General’s Literary Award for Non-Fiction. Bill has been appointed to the Order of Canada, awarded the Saskatchewan Order of Merit, elected a fellow of t…
 
Ever since J. W. DeForest popularized the phrase "Great American Novel" in 1868 commentators have debated the limits of all three of its components. Does "great" necessarily mean a big "doorstop" book or is concision a worthy goal? Whose version America are we talking? And why the novel not a poem, play, or short story? In our inaugural episode we …
 
Matt Dorfman is an internationally recognized designer and illustrator. He is the art director of the New York Times Book Review and former art director of the New York Times Op-Ed page. Additionally, he maintains a one-person office specializing in work for publishers, film, theater and various cultural institutions. I talked with Matt recently ab…
 
Trigger warning - Discussion of Sarah Everard case (sexual assault, murder) until 14 minutes in. Welcome back to another episode! We're chatting about Chapter 16 of Order of the Phoenix, debating how vanishing spells work, whether you can smell the difference between a sheep and a goat, and how fucked up it is to use acne as a punishment. Merch www…
 
Novelist, screenwriter and essayist Larry McMurtry is best known for his Pulitzer Prize-winning 1985 novel Lonesome Dove, a sweeping historical epic that follows ex-Texas Rangers as they drive cattle from the Rio Grande to Montana. (Update: Larry died yesterday, March 25, 2021). He grew up on a ranch outside of Archer City, Texas, which is the mode…
 
A.O. Scott, The Times’s co-chief film critic, returns to the Book Review’s podcast this week to discuss the work of Tillie Olsen, the latest subject in his essay series The Americans, about writers who give a sense of the country’s complex identity. Olsen, who died in 2007 at 94, was known best as the author of “Tell Me a Riddle,” a collection of t…
 
Ed, Matt, Dave, and the Bailey School gang are back! I mean, they haven't really gone anywhere because this is the normal show and not the long running April fools joke. The Bailey School DropOuts have done it! They have ready every book in the series! What is there to do now, but dream of what comes next?…
 
Richard Nash is a coach, strategist, and serial entrepreneur. He led partnerships and content at the culture discovery start-up Small Demons and the new media app Byliner. Previously he ran independent publishers Soft Skull Press and Red Lemonade where he published Maggie Nelson, Lynne Tillman, Vanessa Veselka’s Zazen, Alain Mabanckou, and many oth…
 
There’s nothing wrong with your eyes: The title of Thomas Dyja’s new book is “New York, New York, New York.” (The triplicate is inspired by the urbanist Holly Whyte’s answer when he was asked to name his three favorite American cities.) On this week’s podcast, Dyja discusses how he went about organizing this sweeping look at the past four decades i…
 
In today's episode we have an amazing special guest - Sequoia from our sister pod Fanatical Fics! We're drinking cider and debating how owls work, how Harry is CLEARLY bi, and how Umbridge is basically Michael Gove.Find Sequoia:www.sequoiasimone.comwww.fanaticalfics.comtwitter.com/fanaticalficswww.instagram.com/fanaticalficstwitter.com/butmakeitsca…
 
Will Schwalbe has spent most of his life in publishing: at William Morrow, and then at Hyperion, where he was Editor in Chief. In January 2008 he left Hyperion to found a startup called Cookstr.com and ran that for six years. It’s now part of Macmillan Publishers, where he has worked since 2014. His books include Send: Why People Email So Badly and…
 
Hans, Chris, and I take a look at a strange work of fiction called a "diptych" by it's author. The book is split into two parts that don't have any plot connections, except that maybe they feature the same main character. Instead of plot unity, the book features thematic unity, as well as some very clever and humorous writing.…
 
Imbolo Mbue first began writing her new novel, “How Beautiful We Were,” in 2002. The book concerns the impact of an American oil company’s presence on a fictional African village. She eventually put the idea aside to work on what turned into her acclaimed debut novel, “Behold the Dreamers.” When she began working again on the earlier idea, it was 2…
 
Since 2012, Jason Rovito has been working with institutional and private collectors to grow the documentary value of their collections "because the Cloud forgets." Subject strengths include: the avant-garde, design, the human sciences, and visual culture across the full spectrum of Special Collections formats: rare books, ephemera, manuscripts, pho…
 
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