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"Heidi" takes us on a journey to the eventful childhood of a good-hearted girl from the Swiss Alps. A warm and loving story, full of touching moments, it reaches children and adults alike. It was written in 1880 and published in two parts: 1. Heidi's years of learning and travel. 2. Heidi makes use of what she has learned. This English translation from 1915 has "an especial flavor, that very quality of delight in mountain scenes, in mountain people and in child life generally, which is one o ...
 
Welcome to the Read Learn Love podcast. Make reading aloud your newest family tradition! Join me each Tuesday on a journey of empowerment where I help parents create a solid foundation for their kids to succeed in school, build positive attitudes towards learning as adults, and rekindle family bonds which tend to get lost in our busy world, all through the power of reading aloud. Research shows reading aloud is the most important activity you can do to help your child's future success. Music ...
 
‘I have written a blasphemous book’, said Melville when his novel was first published in 1851, ‘and I feel as spotless as the lamb’. Deeply subversive, in almost every way imaginable, Moby-Dick is a virtual, alternative bible – and as such, ripe for reinterpretation in this new world of new media. Out of Dominion was born its bastard child – or perhaps its immaculate conception – the Moby-Dick Big Read: an online version of Melville’s magisterial tome: each of its 135 chapters read out aloud ...
 
This will be a daily posting of my trip through the Bible. I will be reading the NET aloud. Each day I will introduce the passage with a brief commentary. But mostly I will simply be reading the Word of God for you. I'd love to hear how God is using this podcast to help you or answer any questions you may have. You can contact me on twitter: @nemoyatpeace or email me at DevotedToScripture@gmail.com.
 
My name is Rabbi Matt Schneeweiss. I am, first and foremost, an Orthodox Jew. My primary area of focus is the teachings of Shlomo ha'Melech (King Solomon) in Mishlei (Proverbs) and Koheles (Ecclesiastes). I also consider myself to be a student of the Stoic masters: Epictetus, Seneca, and Marcus Aurelius. Over the past two decades I have been exploring the relationship between Judaism and Stoicism - where they overlap, where they differ, and how they complement each other. This year I started ...
 
When a modern film script draws inspiration from a poem written more than a century ago, readers can judge its impact on our collective imagination. Such is the resonance of the poem "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe. First published in 1845, "The Raven" is a masterpiece of atmosphere, rhythmic quality and use of language. Constructed in narrative form, it tells the story of a young man who is mourning the loss of his beloved. One December night as he wearily sits up browsing through a classica ...
 
Hey! You’re watching StoryCub - that’s awesome! Could you PLEASE do us favor and give it a 5-star rating on Apple Podcasts and Write a Review! It would help us spread the word and boost our motivation! StoryCub is bridging the gap between the traditional and digital storytime experience. Storytime that is both fun and educational, your child will enjoy and learn from our online Video Picture Books. It’s Storytime, Anytime! - Viewed in more than 150 countries, our early childhood mission is t ...
 
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Synopsis: I didn’t set out to record an episode about a Stoic perspective on Shavuos, and yet, here we are! It just so happens that the letter of Seneca we’ve been reading is perfectly aligned with Judaism’s stance on this topic, and it just so happens that this topic is relevant to Shavuos. For my shiur on the theme of Shavuos, click here for the …
 
Today’s episode is l’zeicher nishmas Eliezer ben Hendel. Synopsis: Today we continue reading from Seneca’s letter of consolation to his mother, Helvia. This excerpt touches upon a number of themes without any common thread that I perceived. Some of these ideas we’ve never discussed and others are fundamental but expressed with Seneca’s unparalleled…
 
Synopsis: Yesterday was Mother’s Day and I decided to see if I could find any Stoic writings on that theme. I selected an excerpt from Seneca’s letter of consolation to his own mother, which – as the title reflects – could be perceived as rather ruthless. But I do believe that if we understand the wisdom of his words, which are paralleled by Judais…
 
Synopsis: Today we conclude our reading of Seneca’s letter to Lucilius on the topic of friendship and sharing knowledge. All the points Seneca makes in this part of the letter resonated with me on a personal level, in light of my experience as a teacher and as someone who is blessed to live in a community of chachamim. Sources: - Seneca: Letter #6 …
 
Synopsis: Today we begin reading a letter from Seneca to his friend and student, Lucilius, about the nature of a true friendship. His description of such a friendship conforms to the Rambam’s explanation of the type of friend we are commanded by the Sages to acquire for ourselves at all costs. Sources: - Seneca: Letter #6 – On Friendship and the Sh…
 
Sonnet: On Mrs. Kemble’s Readings From Shakespeare by HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW O precious evenings! all to swiftly sped! Leaving us heirs to amplest heritages Of all the best thoughts of the greatest sages, And giving tongue unto the silent dead! How our hearts glowed and trembled as she read, Interpreting by tones the wondrous pages Of the great…
 
Synopsis: Have you ever heard of the tragedy of Golden Boy, the shirt? In today’s episode I will recount for you my own version of that tale – but one which ends on a happy note. I’m sure I’ve read these passages from Epictetus in the past, but as I mentioned at the outset of this week, reviewing Stoic ideas is critical for internalizing them, and …
 
Synopsis: Today’s reading is from a chapter in Epictetus’s handbook which is loaded with weighty concepts. Our focus, however, will be on a single point. Stoicism and Judaism both prompt us to turn our focus inwards, and to recognize how we are complicit in our own suffering. However, Shlomo ha’Melech (King Solomon) takes a very different direction…
 
Synopsis: Earlier this year I recorded an episode entitled “Stoic Compassion for Those Who Stumble.” Today I decided to review the same passages we read in that episode, adding a new layer from IFS (Internal Family Systems). I did my best to steer clear of going too much into IFS and tried to keep the ideas in as “normal sounding” terms as possible…
 
Synopsis: I recorded today’s episode last week a couple of hours before Shabbos. I was in a particularly contemplative mood and decided to express my thoughts verbally. I wasn’t sure whether I was going to post it, for fear of it being TOO personal or TOO open, but I listened to it again today and deemed it shareable. I had initially planned to pos…
 
Synopsis: Today’s episode was an experiment prompted by an IFS (Internal Family Systems) self-therapy session I had in which I attempted to gain insight into why I didn’t want to record an episode today. I debated whether to record this, and even after that, I debated whether to publish it. In the end I decided that even though I don’t explain the …
 
Synopsis: In today’s episode we examine another example of a harsh truth taught by Epictetus in (what I deem to be) too harsh of a manner. The points he makes are compelling but he frames them in a way that risks alienating his audience with his absolutism. Are matters as black-and-white as he makes them seem? Is there a middle ground? And if there…
 
THE PLANTING OF THE APPLE-TREE by William Cullen Bryant Come, let us plant the apple tree. Cleave the tough greensward with the spade; Wide let its hollow bed be made; There gently lay the roots, and there Sift the dark mould with kindly care, And press it over them tenderly, As, round the sleeping infant’s feet, We softly fold the cradle-sheet; So…
 
Synopsis: In yesterday’s episode we discussed Epictetus’s method of “using impressions” to change our experience of life. In today’s episode Marcus Aurelius gives us an impressions-based technique for dealing with injuries and insults from our fellow human beings – one which might help us to implement the loftier and more philosophically attuned me…
 
Synopsis: Last month I made an episode in which I objected to Marcus Aurelius’s practice of deriding food, drink, and other material enjoyments by means of hyperrealistic “objective” descriptions (e.g. describing coffee as “hot bean juice”). In today’s episode we reexamine that technique and recognize its place in our lives. Related Episodes: - Cof…
 
Synopsis: Today is Friday, and you know what that means: time for The Stoic Jew Q&A! As you can tell from the title of the episode, today’s question is not so much of a question (nor was it submitted as such) but a request. This is not the first time I’ve been asked to slow down, but it is the first time I’ve examined this personal fault of style t…
 
Synopsis: Warning – if you’re expecting a clear, neatly packaged, practical insight, then I advise you to skip this episode and listen to another one. Epictetus and I have been gradually coming to a head, and I finally decided to attempt to talk about it. The key word here is “attempt.” On the one hand, I am aware that Epictetus’s view of The Good …
 
THE BIRDS OF KILLINGWORTH by HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW It was the season, when through all the land The merle and mavis build, and building sing Those lovely lyrics, written by His hand, Whom Saxon Cædmon calls the Blithe-heart King; When on the boughs the purple buds expand, The banners of the vanguard of the Spring, And rivulets, rejoicing, rush…
 
Synopsis: Today’s episode was inspired by a coffee-related mishap which led to a critique of Epictetus’s Stoicism, in contrast to Shlomo ha’Melech’s foundational Stoicism in Mishlei. Epictetus isn’t entirely at fault here, but in my opinion, the way he teaches Stoicism lends itself to these fallacious ways of thinking. For my other episode about co…
 
Science is everywhere. It’s in everything we do, everything we see. And yes, everything we read. Books offer a delightful opportunity to talk about science, both through their illustrations and their text. We just need to know a few things to look for and a few questions to ask. Today we’ll find out how to think like a scientist, and how to teach o…
 
Synopsis: In today’s episode we discuss the different perspectives on sleep, as reflected in the teachings of Marcus Aurelius and the Rambam. I hesitate to characterize this as “the Stoic view on sleep” because this was literally the only Stoic teaching I could find on the topic, but perhaps that fact is significant in and of itself. Regardless, I …
 
Synopsis: Today will be our last episode on Letter #123 (for now, at least). In this excerpt Seneca provides us with further guidance on how to resist the “counterfeit Stoicism” we read about last time. His method parallels that of the Rambam in Hilchos Deios and Shemoneh Perakim, although it’s not exactly the same. The reason I wanted to record th…
 
Synopsis: In today’s episode we read an example of a particularly insidious form of rationalization – one in which your yetzer ha’ra uses a counterfeit version of the value system you’ve embraced and persuades you to engage in self-destructive behavior, thinking that you’re making progress. And when this rationalization is promoted by the people yo…
 
Synopsis: Yesterday we discussed the “disease” of the relative value system, and the pain and unhappiness that comes from comparing yourself to others. Today we discuss the “cure” for this disease, as prescribed by Seneca and the Rambam. Some may find this remedy to be difficult to implement in practice, but I argue that even if a total implementat…
 
PEGASUS IN POUND by HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW Once into a quiet village, Without haste and without heed, In the golden prime of morning, Strayed the poet’s wingèd steed. . . . . Loud the clamorous bell was ringing From its belfry gaunt and grim; ‘Twas the daily call to labor, Not a triumph meant for him. . . . . Thus, upon the village common, By t…
 
Synopsis: In today’s episode we continue reading Seneca’s Letter #123. In this excerpt he discusses what we might view as a very “modern” problem, namely, desiring possessions simply because everyone else seems to own them. As value as this lesson is in its own right, I think it applies equally to things that really matter, such as our learning, ou…
 
Synopsis: I liked the letter we started yesterday so much that I decided to continue it in today’s episode. Because Rosh Chodesh and its newfound significance (thanks to Sforno’s idea, which I discussed in Season 3 Episode 17) has been on my mind, I decided to use Seneca’s words as a springboard to suggest a method for using Rosh Chodesh as a tool …
 
Synopsis: We’re back for Season 4 of The Stoic Jew podcast! In today’s episode we hear Seneca’s strategy for making his bad bread taste good – a strategy which is also taught by Shlomo ha’Melech in Mishlei. Although it may look like both of them are advocating asceticism, they are really doing the opposite: showing you how to maximize pleasure in t…
 
After Daniel's and Joseph's pa died at the Alamo, the boys joined Sam Houston's brigade to fight for Texas independence. After Santa Anna's surrender, Sam Houston passed around an ear of corn from their meager supplies and encouraged each soldier to take a kernel home so that they could cultivate the arts of peace as nobly as they had mastered the …
 
THE CHALLENGE by HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW I have a vague remembrance Of a story, that is told In some ancient Spanish legend Or chronicle of old. It was when brave King Sanchez Was before Zamora slain, And his great besieging army Lay encamped upon the plain. Don Diego de Ordoñez Sallied forth in front of all, And shouted loud his challenge To th…
 
Is homeschooling with dyslexia a good idea? Can dyslexic students thrive, even if the parents aren’t specialists (or even certified teachers)? Let’s be clear: absolutely, yes. You can homeschool your dyslexic kids, and you’ll do a darn good job of it, too. Today on the podcast, Marianne Sunderland from Homeschooling with Dyslexia is back to talk ab…
 
Today we’re going to talk about Dr John S Hutton and his amazing research using an MRI to prove what previous decades of studies has always said "Early reading is essential future success". We discuss the brain fireworks, or synapses, and how those reacted differently when a) a child was just being read to b) when a child was listening to and looki…
 
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