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Beste Anthropology podcaster vi kunne finne
Beste Anthropology podcaster vi kunne finne
Disse antropologipodcastene dekker alt fra geologi, biologisk mangfold, uvanlig kunnskap om mennesker, kultur, historie, menneskehetens potensiale og mer ⁠— så utforsk disse podcastene på egen hånd, så blir du ikke skuffet!
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Stupid Anthropology

Stupid Anthropology

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Stupid Anthropology has birthed from the ashes of The Right Can’t Read. We have leapt from the desiccated skull like a weird zombie Athena to sometimes ask stupid questions, sometimes our stupid ideas, sometimes our stupid screaming into the void. Join Aaron, Robert, and Jonny as we explore whatever diseased questions pop into our collapsing brains. Questions such as: What’s the deal with selling out? Who are the worst people that came on Oprah’s show? What’s the deal with airline food?
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Anthropology on Air

Department of Social Anthropology, University of Bergen

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Anthropology on Air is a podcast brought to you by the Social Anthropology department at the University of Bergen in Norway. Each season, we bring you conversations with inspiring thinkers from the anthropology world and beyond. The music in the podcast is made by Victor Lange, and the episodes are produced by Sadie Hale and Sidsel Marie Henriksen. You can follow us on Facebook. Visit uib.no/antro, where you can find more information on the ongoing work and upcoming events at the department.
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Real life lectures recorded from a college classroom, on the topic of Physical Anthropology. It introduces primates, biology, evolution, fossils, dentition, and much more - relating to monkeys, primates and humans.
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The Anthropology in Business podcast is for anthropologists and business leaders interested in learning more about the many ways anthropology is applied in business and why business anthropology is one of the most effective lenses for making sense of organizations and consumers. It is hosted by Matt Artz, a business anthropologist specializing in design anthropology and working at the intersection of product management, user experience, and business strategy. To learn more about the Anthropo ...
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SAGE Anthropology & Archaeology

SAGE Publications Ltd.

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Welcome to the official free Podcast site from SAGE Publications for Anthropology & Archaeology. SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets with principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, and Singapore.
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Conversations in Anthropology

Conversations in Anthropology

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A podcast about life, the universe and anthropology produced by David Boarder Giles, Timothy Neale, Cameo Dalley, Mythily Meher and Matt Barlow. Each episode features an anthropologist or two in conversation, discussing anthropology and what it has to tell us in the twenty-first century. This podcast is made in partnership with the American Anthropological Association and with support from the Faculty of Arts & Education at Deakin University.
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Nutrition Anthropology Podcast

Annette Adams, MDA, RDN, LD/N

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Has one-size-fits-all nutrition advice let you down? Join registered dietitian nutritionist, Annette Adams, as she shares a new approach to health and well-being that honors you as the expert of you. Nutrition Anthropology podcast discusses social customs, beliefs, and norms regarding nutrition through a weight neutral lens. We tackle human behavior – past and present – as it relates to food and well-being. Our mission is to provide a safe space for every body to create a positive relationsh ...
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The Innovation in Digital Anthropology podcast is brought to you by the LiiV Center and Matt Artz. The LiiV Center is a nonprofit advancing how the world understands people in the digital age. The team at the Liiv Center, in partnership with UNESCO, is working to advance education, technology, and awareness for innovation in digital anthropology as a force for good across the public and private sectors. To help accomplish that goal, we have created this podcast, in which we will explore the ...
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The Anthropology, AI, and the Future of Human Society podcast mini-series was created in anticipation of the upcoming Anthropology, AI, and the Future of Human Society Virtual Conference. It is being organized by the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland and runs from June 6-10th, 2022. The podcast was created as a partnership between the Royal Anthropological Institute and Matt Artz.
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Immanuel Kant gave a series of lectures on anthropology 1772-1773, 1795-1796 at the University of Königsberg, which was founded in 1544. His lectures dealt with recognizing the internal and external in man, cognition, sensuousness, the five senses, as well as the soul and the mind. They were gathered together and published in 1798 and then published in English in The Journal of Speculative Philosophy in 1867, volumes 9-16. Therefore, several texts will be used for this book. I was able to fi ...
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The low-wage service industry is one of the fastest-growing employment sectors in the US economy. Its workers disproportionately tend to be low-income and minority women. Service sector work entails rigid forms of temporal discipline manifested in work requirements for flexible, last-minute, and round-the-clock availability, as well as limited to n…
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Jonny, Robert, and Aaron talk the ultimate sin: Selling out. Is there a counterculture? Are we all the sellout hobo from They Live? What are our personal brands? All these questions - and more - are asked in this episode of Stupid Anthropology. Oh yeah, we're Stupid Anthropology now. We will miss Rachel, but she's off to bigger and better things in…
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In this episode of Anthropology on Air, we speak with Penny Harvey, Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Manchester in the UK. Penny is a Fellow of the British Academy, of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, and the Academia Europaea. Penny is a highly influential thinker on the topic of infrastructures. She is well known…
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In this podcast episode, Professor Burlingame breaks down why calling stereotypes "wrong" is inaccurate and what the real issue is with using or thinking in stereotypes. This podcast is a must for anyone looking to improve their relationships through a deeper understanding of people -- others and yourself. (8 minutes and 25 seconds) Get "The Tolera…
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Indonesia is the world's second largest cigarette market: two out of three men smoke, and clove-laced tobacco cigarettes called kretek make up 95 percent of the market. To account for the staggering success of this lethal industry, Kretek Capitalism: Making, Marketing, and Consuming Clove Cigarettes in Indonesia (University of California Press, 202…
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Scientists uncover compelling evidence suggesting that the hunting strategies of early humans involved long-distance running, challenging conventional beliefs about the physical demands and efficiency of such pursuits. Some hunts on foot covered 62 miles, the team say Credit: Alamy Challenging Assumptions Recent research published in the journal Na…
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The study1 of ancient DNA has led to a groundbreaking discovery: the remnants of three common human viruses within the bones of Neanderthals who roamed the Earth over 50,000 years ago. This finding opens a window into the past, shedding light on the viral landscape of our ancient relatives and raising intriguing questions about the potential recrea…
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A bone, meticulously carved with 17 parallel incisions, offers a window into the ancient world of the Neanderthals. Discovered in Poland, this artifact challenges our understanding of their cognitive abilities and symbolic culture. Different views of a roughly 4-inches-long (10.6 centimeters) bear bone that has Neanderthal-made cut marks on it. (Im…
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In 1974 the government of Jordan established a new ministry to oversee a nationwide scheme to buy and distribute subsidized flour and regulate bakeries. The scheme sets terms for the politics that are the subject of a new book: States of Subsistence: The Politics of Bread in Contemporary Jordan (Stanford University Press, 2022). Rest assured, this …
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The story of human evolution is etched in the ancient landscapes of China, where remarkable fossil finds offer tantalizing glimpses into our shared past. Among these treasures, the Liujiang human fossil have long captivated the imagination of researchers, offering valuable insights into the early occupation of Eastern Asia. Now, a groundbreaking st…
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In the annals of the human story, few narratives are as compelling as the journey of Australia and New Guinea's First Peoples across the vast expanse of Sahul. Now, a groundbreaking study1 led by the University of Sydney sheds new light on the migration patterns of these early pioneers, offering fresh insights into their remarkable odyssey spanning…
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America's elite law firms, investment banks, and management consulting firms are known for grueling hours, low odds of promotion, and personnel practices that push out any employees who don't advance. While most people who begin their careers in these institutions leave within several years, work there is especially difficult for Black professional…
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Anti-Semitic or philo-Semitic? Backward or modern? Locally rooted or diasporic? “Polishness” is too often flattened to an oversimplified list of either-or propositions. But a critical look at the multiple, contradictory versions of “Polishness” circulating in the modern era helps us to make sense not only of Poland’s past and present, but of a whol…
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The transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture marked a pivotal moment in human history, revolutionizing diet and lifestyle. Yet, the dietary practices of pre-agricultural societies have remained elusive. A groundbreaking study now offers a glimpse into the culinary traditions of ancient hunter-gatherers, shedding light on their plant-bas…
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In the heart of Iraqi Kurdistan lies a cave that holds secrets from the depths of time. Among its ancient chambers, nestled in a gully, lay the remains of a 40-something woman, known as Shanidar Z. In a groundbreaking discovery, scientists have meticulously reconstructed her skull, offering a glimpse into the life of a Neanderthal who walked the Ea…
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The Avars, a formidable warrior society of Central and Eastern Europe, once dominated vast territories in the 6th century. In a groundbreaking study published in Nature1, researchers delve into the genetic legacy of this enigmatic civilization, shedding light on their intricate marriage customs and social structures. A view of the excavation site a…
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In Haitian Vodou, spirits impact Black practitioners' everyday lives, tightly connecting the sacred and the secular. As Eziaku Atuama Nwokocha reveals in Vodou En Vogue: Fashioning Black Divinities in Haiti and the United States (UNC Press, 2023), that connection is manifest in the dynamic relationship between public religious ceremonies, material …
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In the heart of Central Italy lies a region steeped in history, where the whispers of the past offer invaluable insights into the present challenges of wildfire management. Environmental anthropologist from my Alma matter, University of California, Santa Cruz Professor Andrew Mathews has embarked on a journey1 through time, unraveling the untold st…
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Sreeparna Chattopadhyay's book The Gravity of Hope (Crossed Arrows, 2023) is a non-fictional account of women’s lives who sometimes endured, often resisted and ultimately coped with marital violence as best as they could in an informal settlement in northeastern Mumbai. It uses anthropological methods and two decades of research-driven insights to …
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Fiercely intelligent, fantastically transgressive, Working It: Sex Workers on the Work of Sex (PM Press, 2023) is an intimate portrait of the lives of sex workers. A polyphonic story of triumph, survival, and solidarity, this collection showcases the vastly different experiences and interests of those who have traded sex, among them a brothel worke…
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Singular Selves: An Introduction to Singles Studies (Routledge, 2024) edited By Ketaki Chowkhani and Craig Wynne examines, for perhaps the first time, singlehood at the intersections of race, media, language, culture, literature, space, health, and life satisfaction. It adopts an interdisciplinary approach, borrowing from sociology, literary studie…
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As developing states adopt neoliberal policies, more and more working-class women find themselves pulled into the public sphere. They are pressed into wage work by a privatizing and unstable job market. Likewise, they are pulled into public roles by gender mainstreaming policies that developing states must sign on to in order to receive transnation…
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Capitalism is not only an economic system but also a system of production and allocation of hope. In Egypt, a generation of young men desire fulfilling employment, meaningful relationships, and secure family life, yet find few paths to achieve this. In The Labor of Hope:: Meritocracy and Precarity in Egypt (Stanford UP, 2023), Harry Pettit follows …
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Over the last two decades in Beirut, graffiti makers have engaged in a fierce “war of colors,” seeking to disrupt and transform the city’s physical and social spaces. In A War of Colors: Graffiti and Street Art in Postwar Beirut (University of Texas Press, 2024), Dr. Nadine Sinno examines how graffiti and street art have been used in postwar Beirut…
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The Indian state of Kerala is one of the largest blocs of migrants in the oil economies of the Arab Gulf. Looking closely at the cultural archives produced by and on the Gulf migrants in Malayalam -- the predominant language of Kerala -- The Gulf Migrant Archives in Kerala: Reading Borders and Belonging (Oxford UP, 2024) takes stock of circular mig…
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What does cow care in India have to offer modern Western discourse animal ethics? Why are cows treated with such reverence in the Indian context? Join us as we speak to Kenneth R. Valpey about his new book Cow Care in Hindu Animal Ethics (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019). Valpey discusses his methodological odyssey looking at ancient Hindu scriptural acco…
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Labor and race have shared a complex, interconnected history in America. For decades, key aspects of work—from getting a job to workplace norms to advancement and mobility—ignored and failed Black people. While explicit discrimination no longer occurs, and organizations make internal and public pledges to honor and achieve “diversity,” inequities p…
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Is alcohol a universal feature of human society? Why is problematic in some countries and not others? How was alcohol helped build the modern state? These are just a few of the questions that sociologist John O'Brien addresses in States of Intoxication: The Place of Alcohol in Civilisation(Routledge, 2018). His book offers a broad and diverse persp…
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Half of all 7,000-plus human languages may disappear over the next century and—because many have never been recorded—when they’re gone, it will be forever. Dr. Ross Perlin, a linguist and co-director of the Manhattan-based non-profit Endangered Language Alliance, is racing against time to map little-known languages across the most linguistically di…
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Imagine an environmentalist. Are you picturing a Birkenstock-clad hippie? An office worker who hikes on weekends? A political lobbyist? What about a modern day timber worker? This last group is at the center of University of Oregon historian Steven C. Beda's new book, Strong Winds and Widow Makers: Workers, Nature, and Environmental Conflict in Pac…
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In this special episode, we speak with Tomas Salem, a PhD fellow in our own department of Social Anthropology at the University of Bergen. We do a deep dive on some of the themes covered in Tomas’s first book, Policing the Favelas in Rio de Janeiro: Cosmologies of War and the Far-Right (Palgrave Macmillian, 2024), which is released this week. Based…
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In Seeking a Future for the Past: Space, Power, and Heritage in a Chinese City (U Michigan Press, 2024), Philipp Demgenski examines the complexities and changing sociopolitical dynamics of urban renewal in contemporary China. Drawing on ten years of ethnographic fieldwork in the northeastern Chinese city of Qingdao, the book tells the story of the …
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