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A podcast about Open Science, Open Access, Open Education, Open Data, Open Software ... pretty much «open anything». Produced by the University Library at UIT The Arctic University of Norway. Founder and host of episodes 1-31: Erik Lieungh. Host from episode 32 onwards: Per Pippin Aspaas.
 
An international Dharma teacher since 1999, Jaya Ashmore guides listeners to the heart of meditation and freedom in her talks. She draws from and brings to life ancient texts from diverse traditions, modern poetry and science, and the tenderness and power of our puzzling human experience. With over 30 years of meditation experience primarily in India, Jaya evokes transformative depth and joy in all of life--from daily life, to meditation basics and more subtle areas. Her fresh, unique and pr ...
 
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show series
 
This interview was recorded in July 2020 for DocEnhance (docenhance.eu), an EU-funded project that aims to broaden the expertise of PhDs by developing courses in transferable skills. One such transferable skill is how to manage your research data in a transparent manner and as much as possible in accordance with the FAIR principles (Findable, Acces…
 
Eirik Samuelsen, senior meteorologist at the Norwegian Meteorological Institute (Met) and UiT The Arctic University of Norway, discusses the importance of citizen science to current meteorology in Norway. Amateurs contribute to the improvement of weather forecasts in various ways, from anecdotic but valuable feedback on errors in the forecast to a …
 
Mariann Løkse, head of Library Services, and Øystein Lund, head of the Resource Center for Teaching, Learning and Techology at UiT The Arctic University of Norway share their thoughts on open education. They talk us through information literacy, MOOCs, learning outcomes from online courses as compared to traditional classroom lectures, and a range …
 
In this episode, we are exploring a student's perspective on open science – and specifically replication studies. Kristoffer Klevjer recently finished his master’s degree in psychology at UiT The Arctic University of Norway and has now taken on a PhD. But already as a master student, he was involved in replication studies. In his experience, replic…
 
In this episode, we are discussing how to teach open science to PhD students. Helene N. Andreassen, head of Library Teaching and Learning Support at the University Library of UiT the Arctic University of Norway shares her experiences with the integration of open science in a special, tailor-made course for PhD's that have just started their project…
 
In this episode, we are talking about what it is like to live without the larger journal deals. In 2018, Sweden announced that they terminated their previous agreement with Elsevier, and was without a deal until the start of 2020. We want to know how the library and researchers managed without, what they did, and how they feel about the new deal th…
 
In this episode, we are talking about code and the benefits of making your code available in a peer review process and having it checked. Our guest is Dr. Stephen Eglen from the department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics at the University of Cambridge. Together with Dr. Daniel Nüst, from the University of Münster, he has created Code…
 
Our guest today is Lucy Barnes, Editor and Project Coordinator at Open Book Publishers. She talks about what it is to be a small not-for-profit open access book publisher. Together with other publishers, they have formed ScholarLed with the philosophy of ‘scaling small’; in other words, rather than seeking to grow their reach by any one of them bec…
 
In this episode, we talk about Music Research, and how it is to practice open research within this field. Our guest is Alexander Jensenius, Associate Professor at the Department of Musicology- Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies in Rhythm, Time and Motion (IMV) at the University of Oslo. He is also behind MusicLAb, an event-based project where dat…
 
Is it fair that researchers and policymakers in low-income countries have to pay to read new research on diseases they treat? Today's guest is Robert Terry from the World Health Organization’s Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR), where he works as a manager of research policy. His background is from both the Royal…
 
There are other ways of doing Open Access than the model in Europe and North-America. So what can we learn from colleagues in Latin America? Dr. Arianna Becerril-García is a professor at the Autonomous University of the state of Mexico, and the chair of AmeliCA and Executive Director and co-founder of Redalyc.org. She shares her opinion on the valu…
 
Sweden has made a new deal with the publisher Elsevier. The previous agreement with Elsevier was terminated in 2018, as the Bibsam Consortium & Elsevier were unable to reach a solution that met both parties' requirements for prices and open access. In this episode, we talk to Wilhelm Widmark, Library Director at Stockholm University, who has also b…
 
In this episode, we talk to Samir Hachani, Ph.D. & lecturer at the School of Library Science at the University of Algiers, about the injustice of publications between the Global North and the Global South. We also talk about Journals On Line (JOL) and INASP's effort to create a framework for journal publishing practices and standards for the Global…
 
In this episode, we talk about Wikipedia. Is this something that researchers should engage themselves in? What is the greater good? How do you resolve conflicts over facts? And does your research credentials matter for the Wikipedia-community? My guest today is Trond Trosterud. Professor of Sami Language Technology at UiT The Arctic University of N…
 
How can you inform Ph.D. Candidates and early career researchers about Open Science without becoming too political? Is information given about open science in conflict with the expectations for publishing from our universities? Torstein Låg, psychologist and senior academic librarian at the University Library at UiT The Arctic University of Norway,…
 
Why is it important to preregister research studies? How do you do it, and what kind of bad science do you avoid when you do this within an open science framework? All these questions are answered by our guest, associate professor Matthias Mittner at the research group for cognitive neurosciences at UiT the Arctic University of Norway. The host of …
 
In 2019 Norway decided not to renew their deal with the Dutch publisher Elsevier. The reasons were clear: there was no real transition towards Open Access. Now, a new deal has been signed with the same publisher, and the deal is worth around 9-10 million euros. But the question is: What kind of a deal has been made this time around? Our guest today…
 
In this episode, we talk about the reproducibility crisis and how one can use Open Science as an environment for creating proper replication studies. Our guest is Gerit Pfuhl, associate professor in psychology at UiT - The Arctic University of Norway. She shares her experience with using the Open Science Framework (OSF) in her project "The Collabor…
 
Norway does not have a deal with the publisher Elsevier anymore and follows in Sweden and Germany's footsteps. But why didn't Norway renew their deal? And how will the Norwegian institutions and libraries cope with a future without the largest publisher of academic literature? Also, what does the newly signed deal with Wiley contain? Is that a "per…
 
How can your research impact others outside academia and how do you measure it? In this episode, we discuss the topic of Research Impact – and how to improve it. Our Guest is Guus van den Brekel, medical Information specialist at the University Medical Center at the University of Groningen, in the Netherlands. The host of the podcast is Erik Lieung…
 
In this episode, we talk about the history of scholarly publishing and relates it to today's Open Science debate. Historian, philologist and senior academic librarian, Per Pippin Aspaas, takes us through some historical development of scholarly publishing and his views on Open Science. The host of this episode is Erik Lieungh.…
 
In this episode, we talk to one of the big ones - the global publishing company Wiley. Wiley is a company with over 5000 employees that specializes in academic publishing. Our guest is Alice Wood, senior publishing development editor at Wiley. We want to know what their take on Open Science and Plan S is? What happens when you "flip" a journal? And…
 
In this episode of Open Science Talk, we are joined by the founder of the campaign #bulliedintobadscience, Corina Logan. Logan is a Senior Researcher at the Department of Human Behavior, Ecology and Culture at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. She explains what she means by "Bad Science", including important terms like P-hacki…
 
In this episode, we try to explain what The Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA) is, and what happens after you have signed the declaration? Kenneth Ruud, Deputy Vice Chancellor of Research at UIT – The Arctic University of Norway give us an insight into how this declaration will change his organization and what challenges they are facing. The…
 
In this episode, we talk about the psychology of publishing Open Access. What are the main factors for not choosing OA-publications, and how could institutions and policymakers better understand the choice of the researcher. Organizational psychologist and ph.d. candidate Lars Moksness at the Tromsø School of Business and Economics at UIT - The Arc…
 
In this episode professor at UIT - The Arctic University of Norway, Bård Smedsrød, gives us an insight into peer review. How does the system work today, and what's problematic with it? Smedsrød also offers some solutions and encourages Universities to be much more involved in the peer review process. The host of this episode is Erik Lieungh.…
 
In this episode, we discuss different ways to get a hold of articles in science. There is a wide range of possibilities, some of them are also illegal and should not be used. Today's guest is Guus van den Brekel, medical Information specialist at the Central Medical Library at the University of Groningen, in the Netherlands. The host of this episod…
 
What are the main reasons for our scientists not to choose Open Access to their publications? Are the reasons just misconceptions, or are there some valid reasons as well? Adviser Aysa Ekanger at the University Library at the University of Tromsø lays out the main reasons and some of the solutions to the concerns with Open Access. The host of this …
 
Why is it important that Senior Scientists engage themselves in Open Science and particularly Open Data? Lars Figenschou, biologist and Academic Librarian at the University Library at UIT - The Arctic University in Tromsø, explains why. In addition, he gives us some good tips on how to create a program at the University that secures valuable data. …
 
In this episode we discuss Plan S. The initiative brings together eleven top national research funders, plus the European Research Council, in an effort to release some of the world’s highest quality and highest impact research from behind journal paywalls. Today's guest is Jan Erik Frantsvåg, Open Access adviser at the University Library at UIT - …
 
What is Open Science and why do we need it? Can Open Access scholarly publishing deliver the same quality as traditional subscription based journals do? Today's guest is Stein Høydalsvik, senior adviser for publishing and research support at the University Library at UIT - The Arctic University in Tromsø, Norway. The host of this episode is Erik Li…
 
In this talk, on processing big emotions, Ashmore calls upon the wisdom of the traditional village snake-handlers of India, along with contemporary poetry and ancient spiritual texts. With astute sensitivity, Ashmore makes room for the fear to see clearly, as well as our "snake-y alive wish to see clearly anyway." Her approach is imaginative, spont…
 
This talk is quite long and discusses some deep concepts but is well worth listening to until the end. In fact, it rewards repeated listening. Beginning with a discussion on the nature of Joy, the talk encourages us to maintain our practice even in the face of difficult emotions. Jaya maps a path through rocky terrain, suggesting we use the tools o…
 
This talk speaks about discrimination in a positive sense...seeing what doesn't need anything more from us, and just enjoying. Growing the ability to see what is worthy of our attention. Living what calls us.Through modern poetry and stories from the Buddha’s time, Jaya brings the teachings closer to our daily lives’ practice.…
 
In this talk Jaya speaks about a friend who recently died, and who was a person who was able to deliver supreme teachings and daily life/lightening teachings and groundedness. Jaya discuss her own experience with turbulence in the mind, with the 5 obstructions and the idea that if you are experiencing turbulence in your meditation, you're in line w…
 
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