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The Art History Babes

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The Art History Babes

Recorded History Podcast Network

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~life is short, art is long~ Corrie, Nat, Ginny, & Jen discuss all things visual culture *Regular episodes: hanging out, talking about art - kind of like a college seminar and house party combined. *Art History Babe Briefs (Art History BBs) : quick art history facts minus the expletives. *Hot Takes: The Babes mix it up, chatting about topics outside the realm of established art history.
 
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History in a Hurry

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History in a Hurry

Generic Podcast Network

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A history podcast for people who don't necessarily like history. Want to learn a little bit about Ancient Rome or the Black Death but don't want to spend hours doing it? Jack and Lauren present a topic in history quick enough for your commute. Now sit back, relax, and learn something.
 
The Irish Republic's foundation is one hell of a story, complete with spying secretaries, pig thieves, politicians, poets, school teachers and the world's biggest empire. In quick, bite-sized episodes, we're going to explore the causes, characters and aftermath of the Irish War of Independence. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
From the strange and funny, to the in depth and serious, Days of Yore will cover stories of yester-year from around the globe. The past is chalked full of interesting tales, many of which connect us to a lost time, and each other as an ever advancing people. We are bound by our earth, and our past. We hope you stop in and lend us an ear, because you never know, you might learn something new.
 
HistoryChatter offers an informed take on our shared pasts. Designed and performed by Anirban Bandyopadhyay (Ph.D.), a trained historian and writer, the podcast offers a perspective on the past that shows how multiple interpretations of our pasts and our histories emerge. HistoryChatter believes diversity is not, difference and that difference does not produce inferiority of superiority. More importantly, it believes the past is made of many stories, and many more stories about the past will ...
 
First published in 1908, A Short History of The United States by Edward Channing aims to provide a compact and concise account of the events that went into the making of the United States of America. Divided into 45 short chapters which are laid out point-wise, the book is designed as a school text book. Each chapter has a section at the end with a set of questions regarding the facts given in it. Beginning with theories about the first European who may have “discovered” the North American c ...
 
Today our children are exposed to more sexual imagery and sexual messages than any other generation in history. With media engaging children and teens 24/7, parents are struggling to figure out how to help their children navigate the sexual minefield. There is no precise map, but this program provides practical, credible, actionable clues to help parents get it right.
 
Genealogy Girl Talks is an author, blogger, and family historian who enjoys sharing her knowledge, tips, tricks, and advice with others. She hopes she can help you along your own Genealogy & Family History journey! So, let’s talk all things Genealogy & Family History!
 
A cultural and political history of the Middle East and North Africa, from the ancient centuries of Caesar and Cleopatra in Alexandria (Egypt) to the empires of the medieval and early modern worlds (Umayyads, Abbasids, Ottomans, Safavids) to the transition from empires to nations and the politics of the 2000s. Biographies, book reviews, readings of newspaper articles and op-eds, interviews. Twitter: @profaliakhtar
 
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Hey everyone. It's been... a while. In this episode I catch you up on everything that's been going on, and why I've been away. If you want to support me you can subscribe to my youtube channel: VozhdVon. Follow my twitter account @JosephVon4, or my instagram @vonsbookshelf. I was going to include a patreon link but apparently that's kinda fallen th…
 
Sports and international politics and diplomacy intersect in many ways. The Ping Pong diplomacy between America and China in 1971 was probably the most high-profile instance of sports helping in the resumption of diplomatic relations between two formerly hostile countries. HistoryChatter revisits this landmark episode in international diplomacy on …
 
Amirite? You have the tickets, don't you? Today we talk about those tiny questions at the end of sentences, what purpose they serve, and who is most likely to use them. Plus, we tackle that anxiety producting punctuation mark, the semicolon. | Subscribe to the newsletter for regular updates. http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/subscribe | Watch my Lin…
 
British secret service files on historian Eric Hobsbawm reveal their anxiety against communists and communism. They offer details on methods of espionage, techniques of information gathering and processes of record keeping and information sharing by secret service operatives. Ironically enough, spies of two warring or otherwise hostile countries of…
 
In this week's podcast, we discuss why you should never call your girlfriend your penultimate friend. Plus, we have fun and fascinating facts about Caesar and some of the phrases he gave us, such as "veni, vidi, vici" and "crossing the Rubicon." | Subscribe to the newsletter for regular updates. http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/subscribe | Watch my…
 
Historian Eric Hobsbawm was longtailed by the British Secret Service MI5. He was a member of the Communist Party of Great Britain (CPGB), which the secret service saw as a threat to the nation. The MI5 files on Hobsbawm were finally declassified in 2014, two years after his death in 2012. HistoryChatter looks into the contents of these files in two…
 
WWII was a rich source of new words for the English language. Before the 1940s, you couldn't tell an eager beaver to shut his pie hole while you were being debriefed by the head honcho. And you'll be amazed by the origin of the word "Jeep." And in honor of NaNoWriMo—because you have to name so many things in fiction—we talked about the most common …
 
Diwali often appears to be a common Indian festival. In reality, Indians of various religions observe anniversaries of distinct events on the same day. Kali Puja, which is celebrated most widely in Bengal, and often falls on the same day or time around Diwali, also has a number of origin stories. It is observed in various forms by various communiti…
 
Today, I talked with Saraciea Fennell, who works in publishing, is behind the Bronx Book Festival, and is also the editor of a new anthology, "Wild Tongues Can't Be Tamed," featuring essays from an all-star line-up of Latinx writers. We discussed the thought that goes behind ordering the essays in an anthology, the challenges of trying to edit writ…
 
Jen, Ginny & Nat gather to bring you this special, spooky season episode. The babes cover classic monsters and get a little silly in honor of Halloween. TRAVEL TO MEXICO W US// https://trovatrip.com/trips/mexico-with-art-history-babes-may-2022 //THE AHB CENTER FOR EROTIC ART// https://www.onlyfans.com/artbabes SUPPORT THE AHB// https://www.patreon.…
 
Falafel is now considered a typical middle eastern delicacy. Many countries, including Israel, Palestine, and Yemen claim to be their birthplace. Yet, it was probably invented in Egypt and inspired by the humble Indian Vada or Fulawri. This episode of HistoryChatter explores the appearance, circulation, and contested nationalisation of Falafel in t…
 
The words tombstone and gravestone used to refer to large stone slabs that served as a lid for a tomb or covering for a grave. Also, the human scream has a very particular sound that makes it especially scary (and it's a sound shared by the music in scary movies). Subscribe to the newsletter for regular updates. Watch my LinkedIn Learning writing c…
 
Did you know that many children were eligible to vote in the early twentieth century England? An anomaly in voting laws in England made it possible. This episode of HistoryChatter takes up why it happened and how eventually it was set right. Hosted by Dr. Anirban Bandyopadhyay Don't miss out on the latest time travel stories! Subscribe now to Histo…
 
Have you noticed people switching to the present tense when they're telling stories? It actually has a name: It's called the "historical present tense." This is the article we mentioned if you want to read more about the historical present tense: Schiffrin, Deborah. 1981. Tense variation in narrative. Language 57(1). 45-62. Subscribe to the newslet…
 
Chicago University Professor Wendy Doniger, a living legend studying Hinduism and India over the last sixth years, speaks in this special episode of HistoryChatter about her early career choices, history and myth, her new book on horses in Indian history and mythology and on distinctive approach to studying India, Hinduism, Sanskrit and texts. Host…
 
Many words we use every day are actually trademarks. Did you know about all the words we talked about today? Plus, we talk about some really weird spellings and dunk on "Eats, Shoots & Leaves." Subscribe to the newsletter for regular updates. Watch my LinkedIn Learning writing course. Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter. Peeve Wars card g…
 
The second episode on the many histories of Qutb Minar carries shows how a good historian reads various sources of the past. It considers the ways in which Prof. Sunil Kumar had studied and interpreted the various sources which offer details about the Qutb complex. He shows, for instance, how the Hindu god Vishwakarma is present in these accounts o…
 
Researchers and companies are harnessing computers to identify the emotions behind our written words. While sentiment analysis is far from perfect, it manages to distill meaning from huge amounts of data — and could one day even monitor mental health. In the second segment of this episode, we answer a listener question about the word "schnozz": is …
 
Lal Bahadur Shastri, the second Prime Minister of India, is often remembered only for his successful premiership during the 1965 Indo-Pak war and for his mysterious death while in the office soon after. This episode of HistoryChatter provides an account of his early life and political career instead. In recalling his family background, boyhood expe…
 
In the world of great debates, there is one that has been long enduring and still keeps language prescriptivists awake at night: Is it "tom-ay-to" or "tom-ah-to"? Now, this may not seem as pressing as whether nuclear fusion is possible, but to people in the linguistic trenches, it is pretty darn close. After all, how many linguistic pronunciation a…
 
In this episode we introduce the men that would be sent over to London to negotiate with the British, and ask the question why did Éamon de Valera not take part in the Anglo-Irish Treaty Negotiations. Cover photo: George Gavan Duffy, Erskine Childers, Robert Barton and Arthur Griffith in a group. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out inform…
 
How do description of heritage monuments influence our sense of what is good or bad, or likable or avoidable, about various religious communities? This episode of HistoryChatter pays tribute to the scholarship of Sunil Kumar, who wrote at length about the many ways in which our present concerns influence our understanding of heritage monuments. Typ…
 
The author of "The Language of Leadership," Joel Schwartzberg, explains how you can make small tweaks to your language to make a big difference in your influence. Subscribe to the newsletter for regular updates. Watch my LinkedIn Learning writing course. Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter. Grammar Pop iOS game. Peeve Wars card game. Gram…
 
Our next episode for the Art History Babes’ upcoming collaborative, online art show with National Monument Press: Virtual Realism features artists Connor Czora and Anna Rotty. They discuss their works in the show as well as their processes and how their art making was affected by the US political landscape of the last couple years. Connor's website…
 
The second episode of HistoryChatter Quick takes is about the lighter sides of the Second World War in India. It also highlights the ways in which plenty of public money would be wasted in paying for politician's whims and addictions. Sometimes, men would receive fully paid government jobs to make sure that major figures thousand of miles away were…
 
Based on the history of who was sailing the high seas, it's a good bet pirates sounded a lot more multicultural than Ol’ Long John Silver would have us believe. We also discuss when you need a comma before "because" to avoid confusion. Subscribe to the newsletter for regular updates. Watch my LinkedIn Learning writing course. Join the conversation …
 
What were the concerns before the founding fathers of the Indian constitution with regard to the question of the national language? Why does the language question in India open up a deeply felt divide between north and south India? What are the ways in which language and religion get mixed up in India? The Hindi Diwas special edition of HistoryChat…
 
Instead of grinding your teeth about "very unique," pat yourself on the back for recognizing a widespread case of lexical broadening. Plus, we talk about why some people capitalize "Delta variant" and some don't. Subscribe to the newsletter for regular updates. Watch my LinkedIn Learning writing course. Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter…
 
Did you know how Lord Linlithgow, the Viceroy and Governor-General of India between 1936 and 1943, contribute to the development of animal husbandry in India? The first episode of HistoryChatter Quicktakes tells you that amusing story. Hosted by Dr. Anirban Bandyopadhyay Don't miss out on the latest time travel stories! Subscribe now to Historychat…
 
This episode features two artists from the Art History Babes’ upcoming collaborative, online art show with National Monument Press: Virtual Realism. The lovely Morgane Clément-Gagnon and Jillian Abir MacMaster join Nat, Ginny and Zach Clarke to discuss their work in the upcoming exhibition. (& a very special happy birthday to Jillian..) // Morgane'…
 
We naked apes have been making up sayings with the word "naked" for a long time. Plus, we talk about how to pronounce "short-lived" and when to capitalize "earth." Subscribe to the newsletter for regular updates. Watch my LinkedIn Learning writing course. Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter. Grammar Pop iOS game. Peeve Wars card game. Gra…
 
In 1985 and 1986, mercurial climber Robert Millar twice came one step away from becoming Britain’s first Grand Tour winner – only for a combination of bad luck, mismanagement, Machiavellian machinations and team alliances to thwart him. We remember how the Scot fell short of glory in controversial circumstances. Re-Cycle is written by Felix Lowe, n…
 
This special episode of HistoryChatter features a conversation with Prof. Dipesh Chakrabarty, who works at the University of Chicago. He speaks about his life and career, from his early exposure to philosophy and literature to reading science and management in university to finally moving to doing history quite late in life and eventually making a …
 
What does getting married have to do with honey and the moon? What is tricky about the word "where"? Subscribe to the newsletter for regular updates. Watch my LinkedIn Learning writing course. Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter. Grammar Pop iOS game. Peeve Wars card game. Grammar Girl books. HOST: Mignon Fogarty VOICEMAIL: 833-214-GIRL (…
 
In this episode of Re-Cycle, we re-count when Federico Bahamontes blew a 16-minute lead to hand his big rival Jesús Loroño the yellow jersey on a plate It was one of cycling's bitterest rivalries and that fateful Vuelta 1957 took things to a new level. But there’s much more than there seems to a story that blends social, political, economic, sporti…
 
Now that the Taliban has taken over Afghanistan, it is time to ask questions to why and how the American intervention proved such a total disaster. HistoryChatter addresses that question by revisiting a little-known aspect of the American military intervention in Afghanistan. In 2007, Pentagon introduced a new programme called the Human Terrain Sys…
 
In this episode of Re-Cycle, we re-count the time Rudi Altig defied teammate Jacques Anquetil to win the 1962 Vuelta. Frenchman Jacques Anquetil entered the 1962 Vuelta a España aiming to become the first rider in history to win all three of cycling’s Grand Tours. But the time trial specialist was beaten at his own game by his young teammate, who b…
 
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