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The discussion of factions in American politics is as old as the republic itself. But there is more to consider, particularly in terms of the way that contemporary factions operate within our current political landscape. Political Scientist Rachel Blum, in her new book, How The How the Tea Party Captured the GOP: Insurgent Factions in American Poli…
 
https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/sciencefactionpodcast/SFP_EP370.mp3 This Episode Contains: We join Ben in saying goodbye to the best good dog, Apollo. Devon has been sick working, we talk about why. Steven went to a pumpkin patch, and bought a pumpkin for his chickens. I saw it it written and I saw it say, pink moon is on it’s way: Lunar samples …
 
Book workshops produce great books, but too few scholars have access to the resources needed to organize and execute one, especially scholars at Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic Serving Institutions, Asian American and Pacific Islander Serving Institutions, and Tribal Colleges and Universities. The 2021 American Political Scie…
 
Why do Southeast Asia specialists get tired of explaining that the politics of the region cannot be reduced to a zero-sum game of Chinese-US great power rivalries? How do relatively small Southeast Asian states negotiate their relations with these major powers in an increasingly antagonistic environment? And why has the idea of the Indo-Pacific bec…
 
Interpreting International Politics (Routledge, 2014) is a short and lively account of how international relations was founded and developed as an interpretivist discipline, and why it matters that it was. Its author, Cecelia Lynch, joins this episode of New Books in Interpretive Political and Social Science to discuss the interplay between interpr…
 
Democratic Lessons: What the Greeks Can Teach Us is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Josiah Ober, Tsakopoulos-Kounalakis Professor in Honor of Constantine Mitsotakis Professor of Political Science and Classics at Stanford University. This extensive conversation includes topics such as the serendipitous factors that…
 
I could not think of a better way to start my tenure as host of New Books in Central Asian Studies than discussing Slow Anti-Americanism: Social Movements & Symbolic Politics in Central Asia (Stanford University Press 2021) with its author, Prof Edward Schatz from the University of Toronto. The book offers a privileged vantage point to assess the p…
 
This Episode Contains: We join Ben in saying goodbye to the best good dog, Apollo. Devon has been sick working, we talk about why. Steven went to a pumpkin patch, and bought a pumpkin for his chickens. I saw it it written and I saw it say, pink moon is on it's way: Lunar samples returned by Chang’e-5 tell of recent volcanism. Oceanus Procellarum wa…
 
In the 1960s, the radical youth of Western Europe’s New Left rebelled against the democratic welfare state and their parents’ antiquated politics of reform. It was not the first time an upstart leftist movement was built on the ruins of the old. New Lefts: The Making of a Radical Tradition (Princeton University Press, 2021) traces the history of ne…
 
Everyone has heard of Alexei Navalny, the leader of Russia's opposition to Putin's rule. But what do we really know of him? Navalny: Putin's Nemesis, Russia's Future? (Oxford, 2021) provides the first detailed description of Navalny's history and trajectory. Most importantly, Ben Noble, Morvan Lallouet, and Jan Matti Dollbaum turn the one-dimension…
 
Mary Wollstonecraft (1759 –1797) was one of the most important moral philosophers and political theorists ever. Her writings on liberty and equality have been embraced by thinkers both in her own day and since her early death. Lionized by feminists and demonized by others as dangerous and a loose woman to boot, Wollstonecraft produced a small but p…
 
The phrase, “state of nature”, has been used over centuries to describe the uncultivated state of lands and animals, nudity, innocence, heaven and hell, interstate relations, and the locus of pre- and supra-political rights, such as the right to resistance, to property, to create and leave polities, and the freedom of religion, speech, and opinion,…
 
With years of experience as the Representative of the Fourth District in North Carolina, as an educator, a writer, and a political scientist, David Price examines the last 45 years of politics in the United States Congress, in North Carolina, and in his life as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Representative Price currently serves as …
 
https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/sciencefactionpodcast/SFP_EP369.mp3 This episode contains: PUMPKIN SPICE. Also, we have a patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/sciencefactionpodcast Skepticism 101: We talk about how a helmet and a bullet-riddled plane perfectly demonstrates survivor bias. It’s nice to keep your skeptic toolkit up to date and reme…
 
This episode contains: PUMPKIN SPICE. Also, we have a patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/sciencefactionpodcast Skepticism 101: We talk about how a helmet and a bullet-riddled plane perfectly demonstrates survivor bias. It's nice to keep your skeptic toolkit up to date and remember all the fallacies you shouldn't fall for. https://www.iflscience.…
 
To many observers, Congress has become a deeply partisan institution where ideologically-distinct political parties do little more than engage in legislative trench warfare. A zero-sum, winner-take-all approach to congressional politics has replaced the bipartisan comity ofpast eras. If the parties cannot get everything they want in national policy…
 
How can we best understand ethnic armed organizations on the borderlands of Myanmar? Why did the Karen embrace the military-initiated peace process in 2012, shortly after the Kachin had rejected ceasefire proposals? How can ethnographic fieldwork inform studies of insurgent movements? And what does the February 2021 military coup mean for the futur…
 
Mary (Molly) Scudder, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Purdue University, has a new book that focuses on an incredibly timely issue: how do citizens with deep and conflicting differences come together to foster democratic life? Part of the answer, according to Scudder, is by pursuing the political power of listening. In her book, Beyond …
 
https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/sciencefactionpodcast/SFP_EP368.mp3 This episode contains: Devon joins us from Texas! Steven and Ben talk about Chess and r/AnarchyChess. Steven reveals that this podcast is, indeed, a tragedy. Snakes, Why Did it Have to be Snakes?: Modern snakes evolved from a few survivors of dino-killing asteroid. ‘Creative Dest…
 
This episode contains: Devon joins us from Texas! Steven and Ben talk about Chess and r/AnarchyChess. Steven reveals that this podcast is, indeed, a tragedy. Snakes, Why Did it Have to be Snakes?: Modern snakes evolved from a few survivors of dino-killing asteroid. 'Creative Destruction' allowed snakes to diversify into new niches. https://www.scie…
 
These days, anyone paying close attention to Peru is awash in déjà vu: the ghosts of Peru’s four-decade-old war with the Maoist insurgent group Sendero Luminoso (Shining Path) have resurfaced time and again following the surprise victory of the country’s new left-leaning president. To understand how and why that conflict continues to shape Peruvian…
 
This is a book about the American Dream: how to understand this central principle of American public philosophy, the ways in which it is threatened by a number of winner-take-all economic trends, and how to make it a reality for workers and their families in the 21st century. Integrating political philosophy and the history of political thought wit…
 
The Tashkent-born Russian-American literary critic, editor, essayist, and journalist Vladislav Davidzon has been covering post-Soviet Ukraine for the past ten years, a tumultuous time for that country and the surrounding world. The 2014 “Revolution of Dignity” heralded a tremendous transformation of Ukrainian politics and society that has continued…
 
FASCISM...FRANCE. Two words/ideas that scholars have spent much time and energy debating in relationship to one another. Chris Millington's A History of Fascism in France: From the First World War to the National Front (Bloomsbury, 2019) is a work of synthesis that also draws on the author's own research for key examples and evidence to support its…
 
Political Mourning: Identity and Responsibility in the Wake of Tragedy (Temple UP, 2021) moves us, as readers, beyond the stages of grief to consider the effects of mourning. While grief consists of the internal thoughts, feelings, and ideas surrounding a loss, the process of mourning transforms grief into an external expression of those interior e…
 
https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/sciencefactionpodcast/SFP_EP367.mp3 This episode contains: We start this episode with hanitizer, staying up late, slick ps5 mentions, soda burps, and Brave New World. Doom and Gloom: The warming climate is causing animals to ‘shapeshift’. Several species of Australian parrot have shown a 4%-10% increase in bill siz…
 
This episode contains: We start this episode with hanitizer, staying up late, slick ps5 mentions, soda burps, and Brave New World. Doom and Gloom: The warming climate is causing animals to 'shapeshift'. Several species of Australian parrot have shown a 4%-10% increase in bill size since 1871. Steven attempts to soapbox climate change again, but Sky…
 
Climate change is real, and extreme weather events are its physical manifestations. These extreme events affect how we live and work in cities, and subsequently the way we design, plan, and govern them. Taking action 'for the environment' is not only a moral imperative; instead, it is activated by our everyday experience in the city. Based on the a…
 
Western Jihadism: A Thirty Year History (Oxford University Press, 2021) tells the story of how Al Qaeda grew in the West. In forensic and compelling detail, Jytte Klausen traces how Islamist revolutionaries exiled in Europe and North America in the 1990s helped create and control one of the world's most impactful terrorist movements--and how, after…
 
Throughout its history, Nigeria has been plagued by religious divisions. Tensions have only intensified since the restoration of democracy in 1999, with the divide between Christian south and Muslim north playing a central role in the country's electoral politics, as well as manifesting itself in the religious warfare waged by Boko Haram. Through t…
 
Examining the Green Party Taiwan (GPT) since its establishment through the aftermath of the most recent national elections in January 2020, Dafydd Fell’s Taiwan’s Green Parties: Alternative Politics in Taiwan (Routledge, 2021) focuses on Taiwan’s most important movement party over the last two and a half decades. Despite its limited electoral impac…
 
Robinson Woodward-Burns is the author of Hidden Laws: How the State Constitutions Stabilize American Politics, published by Yale University Press in 2021. Hidden Laws explores the relationship between both state and national constitutional development, debates, and reform. A sprawling study of American constitutional history, Woodward-Burns’s book …
 
On September 3, 2021, Japanese Prime Minister Suga Yoshihide announced that he would not seek reelection as the president of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), effectively declaring his resignation as Japan’s head of government. Listen to Dr. Giulio Pugliese discuss Suga’s short tenure, including his deep unpopularity due to his government’…
 
As governments and corporations mine our “entrenched culture of sharing” to invade privacy (down to Target creating an algorithm to figure out which shoppers are in the 2nd trimester of pregnancy) what happens to democracy? Can democracy survive with no (or very little privacy)? What if the citizenry cares little about privacy and or is unwilling t…
 
Pants on Fire: On Lying in Politics is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and renowned intellectual historian Martin Jay, UC Berkeley. A thought-provoking book in dialogue format examining Martin Jay’s extensive research on lying in politics from Plato and St. Augustine to Hannah Arendt and Leo Strauss which culminated i…
 
How important is Islam to Indonesia’s identity? How different is Salafism from a more mainstream Sunni Islam? Why is it popular with mostly young Indonesian Muslims? And what effect does it have on Indonesian identity and democracy? In this episode, Chris Chaplin joins Petra Desatova to discuss his new book Salafism and the State: Islamic Activism …
 
Few figures stand as prominently in Marxist theory and history as V.I. Lenin. The revolutionary who played a pivotal role in one of the most important events in world history has received reverence, damnation, and everything in between, but much of that response depends on deep misunderstandings of both what he thought and what he did. This misunde…
 
Why are white evangelicals the most skeptical major religious group in America regarding climate change? Previous scholarship has pointed to cognitive factors such as conservative politics, anti-science attitudes, aversion to big government, and theology. Drawing on qualitative fieldwork, Robin Veldman's book The Gospel of Climate Skepticism: Why E…
 
Hamilton: An American Musical made its record-breaking Broadway debut in 2015—but the musical has reached far beyond typical Broadway audiences to pave a path into political discourse, pop culture, classroom curriculums, and the broader conversation about contemporary American politics. What led to this chain reaction of popularity, and how does it…
 
https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/sciencefactionpodcast/SFP_EP366.mp3 This episode contains: It’s almost Devon’s moving day, Ben has some bad luck, Steven visited Chicago. Not Ponytails or Cottontails no, Ducktales. Woo-hoo: A duck named Ripper learned how to say “You bloody fool!” in 1987. In depth analysis of a recorded musk duck named Ripper rev…
 
This episode contains: It's almost Devon's moving day, Ben has some bad luck, Steven visited Chicago. Not Ponytails or Cottontails no, Ducktales. Woo-hoo: A duck named Ripper learned how to say “You bloody fool!” in 1987. In depth analysis of a recorded musk duck named Ripper reveals a shocking truth, he's probably lonely. https://arstechnica.com/s…
 
The Watergate scandal was a horror show. What better way to satirize it than with a horror movie? The Texas Chain Saw Massacre written by Tobe Hooper and Kim Henkel premiered in October 1974, mere weeks after the resignation and pardon of Richard Nixon brought an uncertain end to the most corrupt and criminal presidency in American history. The fil…
 
Howard talks to Henry Hardy, Fellow of Wolfson College, University of Oxford, and the author of In Search of Isaiah Berlin: A Literary Adventure about the many joys—and occasional frustrations—of being the principal editor of one of the 20th century's most captivating public intellectuals. Howard Burton is the founder of Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Fi…
 
What is grand strategy? What does it aim to achieve? And what differentiates it from normal strategic thought--what, in other words, makes it "grand"? In answering these questions, most scholars have focused on diplomacy and warfare, so much so that "grand strategy" has become almost an equivalent of "military history." The traditional attention pa…
 
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