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Not Another Science Podcast is the science radio show from the Edinburgh University Science Magazine. Join our hosts Helena Cornu and Tom Edwick as they talk to staff and students about all the fascinating research and projects happening at the university. Intrigued by sourdough? Passionate about climate change? Love to keep it science? Then this is the show for you. Alix Bailie is our podcast manager. Podcast logo by Apple Chew and episode art by Heather Jones. Get in touch at eusci.podcast ...
 
Edited by bestselling anthologist John Joseph Adams, LIGHTSPEED is a Hugo Award-winning, critically-acclaimed digital magazine. In its pages, you'll find science fiction from near-future stories and sociological SF to far-future, star-spanning SF. Plus there's fantasy from epic sword-and-sorcery and contemporary urban tales to magical realism, science-fantasy, and folk tales. Each month, LIGHTSPEED brings you a mix of originals and reprints featuring a variety of authors, from the bestseller ...
 
Topics on the science of psychotherapy and psychology hosted by the editors of The Science of Psychotherapy magazine. This podcast covers the neuroscience, neurobiology, biology, sociology, brain science, and even the quantum and metaphysical elements that affect our mental well being and how understanding these elements informs the psychotherapist and psychologist.
 
Allumez les neurones, et éveillez votre sixième sens avec «Sixième Science», le podcast de vulgarisation scientifique de «20 Minutes» et «Sciences et Avenir». Santé, techno, environnement... Tous les mois, un journaliste du magazine «Sciences et Avenir» vient aborder, au micro de Romain Gouloumès, un sujet scientifique en compagnie d'un membre de la rédaction de «20Minutes». Pour plus d'informations sur la confidentialité de vos données, visitez Acast.com/privacy Voir Acast.com/privacy pour ...
 
"It's Only Science" is a podcast from the editorial team at Discover Magazine. Every episode, we get the band of nerds together to talk about science. We might discuss the news, play some games or just share something that blew our minds recently. We don't take ourselves too seriously, so join us and have some fun. After all, it's only science.
 
Le but de PsychoShot est d'explorer la psychologie humaine afin de vous donner les meilleures méthodes pour comprendre votre entourage et atteindre vos objectifs. Chaque semaine, découvrez un enseignement qui pourra peut-être changer votre vie. Les contenus de PsychoShot sont issus de la littérature scientifique ou de magazines de vulgarisation que je vous recommande vivement (liste non exhaustive) : - Pour la Science - Cerveau & Psycho - ScientificAmerican Générique : Lotus (feat Deech) - T ...
 
The Undark Podcast continues our mission of illuminating the places where science intersects — and sometimes collides — with our everyday lives, in the form of audio documentaries released monthly from September to May. Scientific questions and challenges, after all, are woven deeply into our politics, our economics, our culture — and they are animated by a wide spectrum of competing values and interests. Our goal is to present rich, narrative-driven audio stories of science as it manifests ...
 
G.L.Vandenburg wrote quirky and funny Science Fiction stories for Amazing Science Fiction Stories, and similar magazines in the 1950's. These four are a selection that give a good taste of his offbeat approach, strange sense of humor and relaxed narrative style that brought joy and excitement to those of us who bought these magazines and saw his name on the cover. In the first, Martian V.F.W., some strange visitors join a parade; in the second, Jubilation, U.S.A, our first visitors from oute ...
 
What if the cataclysmic Tunguska explosion of 1908 was caused, not by a meteor or a comet, but by a microscopic black hole? What if that fantastic object - smaller than an atom, older than the stars, heavier than a mountain - is still down there, orbiting deep inside the earth, slowly consuming the planet? What if only a rookie government agent and an uncannily-insightful consultant stand between a renegade Russian billionaire and his plans to use the black hole to change history - or end it ...
 
Science Talk is a weekly science audio show covering the latest in the world of science and technology. Join Steve Mirsky each week as he explores cutting-edge breakthroughs and controversial issues with leading scientists and journalists. He is also an articles editor and columnist at Scientific American magazine and his column, "Antigravity", is one of science writing's rate venues for humor. Check our the new daily podcast from Scientific American: "60-Second Science." To view all of our ...
 
Rish Outfield and Big Anklevich bring you short stories focusing on the Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror genres. Other genres will also be included, because The Dunesteef Audio Fiction Magazine simply want to bring you the best stories. So tune in and enjoy as these wonderful stories come flowing into your ears to fill your mind with wonder, joy, or dread.
 
Tom Swift is an inventor, and these are his adventures. The locale is the little town of Shopton in upstate New York, near Lake Carlopa. While some of Tom's inventions are not well-founded in a scientific sense, others elaborated developments in the news and in popular magazines aimed at young science and invention enthusiasts. Presenting themselves as a forecast of future possibilities, they now and then hit close to the mark. Some predicted inventions that came true include "photo telephon ...
 
Nous sommes RSI - Radio Slovaquie Internationale. Depuis 1993, nous émettons des informations pour tous ceux qui s’intéressent à notre pays situé au cœur de l’Europe centrale et souhaitent en savoir plus sur la République slovaque. Nous vous proposons des actualités et des émissions consacrées à la politique intérieure et internationale, l’économie, la science, au sport, la culture, l’histoire et au tourisme.
 
Alpha Uncut covers a variety of topics to make your life better! We cover important topics in a fun and entertaining way. We talk about success, money, business, entrepreneurship, investing, free markets, capitalism and economics. We also talk about current trending topics and news that affects your life directly and indirectly. Nick is a contributor for Entrepreneur magazine and has been featured in the Huffington Post. He is a self-made multi-millionaire who created a multi-million dollar ...
 
Known mainly for his tales of adventure, this work of science fiction by Jack London is set in a post-apocalyptic future. It’s 2072, sixty years after the scarlet plague has depopulated the planet. James Howard Smith is one of the few survivors of the pre-plague era left alive in the San Francisco area, and as he realizes his time grows short, he tries to impart the value of knowledge and wisdom to his grandsons. Through his narrative, we learn how the plague spread throughout the world and ...
 
Warlord of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs was first published in 1913. It was the third book in an eleven part series known as the Barsoom Chronicles which relate to a sequence of exciting adventure tales set on the fictional planet of Barsoom. In the Barsoom series, Mars, assumed to be older than Earth, is a dying planet. “Barsoom” is the native word for Mars in the Martian language. The stories first appeared in serialized form in various magazines like All-Story, Argosy, Amazing Stories and ...
 
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A boy who can't live without nature. An apocalypse that tears him away from it. Survival isn't enough if all the wildlife is gone... but proving otherwise might undermine everything he has left. Narrated by the author. Published in Metaphorosis on 17 September 2021. Find the original at magazine.metaphorosis.com.…
 
Online News Editor David Grimm joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about the health and environmental benefits of potty training cows. Next, Peter Teske, a professor in the department of zoology at the University of Johannesburg, joins us to talk about his Science Advances paper on origins of the sardine run—a massive annual fish migration off the coas…
 
Staff Writer Paul Voosen talks with host Sarah Crespi about plans for NASA’s first visit to the Moon in 50 years—and the quick succession of missions that will likely follow. Next, Eileen Roesler, an engineering psychologist at the Technical University of Berlin, discusses the benefits of making robots that look and act like people—it’s not always …
 
She sank to the ground on a world without name. We were far from home, farther than we had ever gone, maybe farther than anyone had ever gone. It was so far away, or at least so strange for some undefinable local cause, that we could have filled volumes with all the alterations in the way things worked; in the ways that light worked, in the way tha…
 
Ils font craquer les Français. Ah ça, nos compatriotes rechignent moins à s'allonger sur la table de l'ostéopathe qu'à offrir leurs dents aux bons soins du dentiste. La France compte la plus grande densité, au monde, de praticiens de l'ostéopathie pour 100.000 habitants. Pourtant, l'efficacité de cette médecine non-conventionnelle est loin d'avoir …
 
Today we get to talk to Steven Taylor, Ph.D., who is a Professor and Clinical Psychologist in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. Dr. Taylor’s work focuses on anxiety disorders and related clinical conditions, and on the psychology of pandemics. He has authored over 300 scientific publications an…
 
Aurora King has worked all her life to make the jump across interstellar space. Now, after nearly a century, she's returning to Earth—tired, empty, and uncertain whether the voyage that cost her everything was worth it. Narrated by host Matt Gomez. Published in Metaphorosis on 10 September 2021. Find the original at magazine.metaphorosis.com.…
 
The coronavirus cuts cells' hairlike cilia, which may help it invade the lungs Trimming the structures prevents mucus from moving the invaders out toward the throat When the coronavirus infects cells in the respiratory tract, it can truncate hairlike projections called cilia, as seen in this artificially colored scanning electron micrograph.…
 
This pictogram is one of the oldest known accounts of earthquakes in the Americas The written chronology in a 16th century codex was created by a pre-Hispanic civilization This pictogram tells of an earthquake that took place in the year 1507.
 
Missing Antarctic microbes raise thorny questions about the search for aliens Seemingly lifeless soils highlight the difficulty of discovering nothing Researchers scoured for microbes near Shakelton glacier in Antarctica (shown).
 
Streetlights, especially super bright LEDs, may harm insect populations Turning down some lights or applying filters might benefit nocturnal insects, a study suggests A pebble prominent moth caterpillar ( Notodonta ziczac ) munches on a leaf.
 
Climate change made Europe's flash floods in July more likely July's floods were a rare event, but such events will become more likely with additional warming Heavy rains swelled the Erft River, flooding a highway near Erftstadt, Germany, and drawing search and rescue teams to the area on July 17.
 
Some wasps' nests glow green under ultraviolet light Fluorescent homes may help wayward insects find their way in the dim twilight The nests of some Asian paper wasps fluoresce when exposed to ultraviolet light, a new study finds.
 
Haiti's citizen seismologists helped track its devastating quake in real time Two scientists explain new and ongoing efforts to understand Haiti's seismic hazards The magnitude 7.2 earthquake that struck Haiti on August 14 has killed at least 1,900 people and caused widespread damage in the country's southern peninsula, including in Les Cayes (show…
 
Fires may have affected up to 85 percent of threatened Amazon species Since 2001, an area up to the size of Washington state has burned A fire burns trees in the Amazon basin in Brazil's Maranhão state in 2014.
 
Astronomers may have seen a star gulp down a black hole and explode It's the first firm evidence of a rare cosmic phenomenon Jets of energy explode from a star that has cannibalized its dead companion in this artist's illustration.
 
If confirmed, tubes in 890-million-year-old rock may be the oldest animal fossils If the fossils turn out to be sea sponges, they'd mark a remarkably early start to animal life This fragment of the skeleton of a modern bath sponge ( Spongia officinalis ) highlights the animal's 3-D meshwork.
 
Dinosaur-killing asteroid may have made Earth's largest ripple marks Impact created a tsunami that etched massive structures under what's now Louisiana, study says The Chicxulub asteroid (illustrated) slammed into Earth where today's Yucatán Peninsula sits.
 
New ideas on what makes a planet habitable could reshape the search for life Some planets in the habitable zone are not good for life, but others outside it might be A planet with a global ocean under a steamy hydrogen atmosphere, like the world shown in this artist's illustration, could be a ripe place to search for life, researchers say.…
 
A super-short gamma-ray burst defies astronomers' expectations The high-energy flash came from an imploding star, not colliding neutron stars When the core of a massive star collapsed in a distant galaxy, the implosion produced high-speed jets giving off powerful gamma rays (illustrated).
 
New 'vortex beams' of atoms and molecules are the first of their kind Scientists previously made twisted beams of light and electrons Scientists made spiraling beams of atoms and molecules, known as vortex beams, for the first time.
 
Squirrels use parkour tricks when leaping from branch to branch Speedy rodents balance tree limb flexibility and distance when zipping through the forest Fox squirrels ( Sciurus niger ) are arboreal acrobats, capable of jumping quickly from tree limb to tree limb.
 
Physicists caught protons 'surfing' on shock waves A laser experiment could help scientists understand how the subatomic particles reach high energies A lab experiment suggests that protons can gain energy by surfing shock waves in space, like the bow shock (red in this illustration) where the solar wind (orange lines) meets Earth's magnetic field …
 
Flashes of Creation' recounts the Big Bang theory's origin story A new book tells the history of George Gamow, Fred Hoyle and the origin of the universe The cosmic microwave background, seen in this all-sky 2013 map from the Planck satellite, is the oldest light in the universe.
 
Pikas survive winter using a slower metabolism and, at times, yak poop Rabbitlike mammals on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau put fussy eaters everywhere to shame A plateau pika peeks out of its burrow on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.
 
Polar bears sometimes bludgeon walruses to death with stones or ice It's long been said that a piece of ice is the perfect murder weapon In this illustration, which appears in an 1865 book by adventurer Charles Francis Hall, a polar bear uses a rock as a tool to kill a walrus.
 
These weird, thin ice crystals are springy and bendy Scientists grew nearly defect-free fibers of frozen water with counterintuitive properties A tiny thread of ice (shown in a microscope image) can bend into a curve and spring back to its original shape when released.
 
Black holes born with magnetic fields quickly shed them New simulations show one way the voids might lose their 'hair' A black hole (left in this simulation) will cast off its magnetic field (indicated with green lines) when surrounded by moving plasma (velocity indicated in red and blue).
 
How intricate Venus's-flower-baskets manipulate the flow of seawater Simulations show that this deep-sea glass sponge's skeleton is more than just pretty The Venus's-flower-basket is a sea sponge found at depths of 100 to 1,000 meters in the Pacific Ocean near the Philippines.
 
Greece's Santorini volcano erupts more often when sea level drops Lower sea levels over the last 360,000 years are linked with more eruptions Sea level seems to influence eruptions from the partially-submerged volcano of Santorini in Greece (pictured).
 
On the Fringe' explores the thin line between science and pseudoscience In his latest book, historian Michael Gordin shows how hard it is to define pseudoscience An alchemist is shown working in his lab in this 17th century painting.
 
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